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How To Train Your Dragon Director Dean DeBlois Will Direct Treasure Island For Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures is set to produce another feature film that will be inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic 1883 novel, Treasure Island. The studio has also hired two-time Oscar nominated How to Train Your Dragon filmmaker Dean DeBlois to direct it.

DeBlois will also help work on the script, which is being written by Beauty and the Beast scribe Evan Spiliotopoulos. There’s no word when the film will go into production as DeBlois is also set to direct Micronauts for Paramount Pictures and Hasbro. With Micronauts having a release date of June 4th, 2021, I imagine that movie will get made first.

Treasure Island tells the story of “young Jim Hawkins who is torn between his loyalty to his benefactors and his affection for Pirate Captain Long John Silver as they seek a buried pirate treasure.” I love the story of Treasure Island and it’ll be interesting to see how this film turns out.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

‘Treasure Island’: Dean DeBlois Set To Direct Take On Classic Novel For Universal & Mandeville Films

  • Deadline
‘Treasure Island’: Dean DeBlois Set To Direct Take On Classic Novel For Universal & Mandeville Films
Exclusive: Deadline has learned that Universal Pictures and Mandeville Films are bringing a new feature adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1883 novel Treasure Island to the big screen with two-time Oscar nominated How to Train Your Dragon filmmaker Dean DeBlois directing.

Beauty and the Beast scribe Evan Spiliotopoulos will write the script, collaborating with DeBlois on the story. Todd Lieberman and David Hoberman of Mandeville Films will produce via their Universal deal alongside DeBlois. It was recently announced that Paramount/Hasbro’s Micronauts would rep DeBlois’ first live-action feature directorial. With that pic dated for June 4, 2021, the thinking is that Micronauts will likely go first given that Treasure Island is in early development.

Treasure Island tells the story of young Jim Hawkins who is torn between his loyalty to his benefactors and his affection for Pirate Captain Long John Silver as they seek a buried pirate treasure. The three notable
See full article at Deadline »

AFI Conservatory Celebrates 50th Anniversary With Big Reunion Drawing Some Very Famous Graduates

  • Deadline
The AFI Conservatory, one of the crown jewels of the American Film Institute, celebrated its 50th anniversary in style Thursday night at the place where it all started, the fabled Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills. One of the first “colleges” for filmmakers (there were only four at the time), it opened at Greystone in 1969 and stayed there until 1981 ,when it moved to Griffith Park, where it still stands at the former Immaculate Heart campus.

The students — or fellows, as they are called for that first class — included future Oscar- nominated legends like Terrence Malick, Paul Schrader, and cinematographer Caleb Deschanel, the latter among many alumni who returned to the original campus for a class-reunion-of-all-class-reunions Thursday. Others attending included three-time Oscar nominee and 2019 Honorary Academy Award winner David Lynch from the class of 1970, Pieter Jan Brugge (Class of 1979), Jay Cassidy (1976), Susannah Grant (1991), Liz Hannah (2009), Marshall Herskovitz (1975), Mel Jones (2010), Matthew Libatique (1992), Melina
See full article at Deadline »

Touch of Evil

When top-billed Charlton Heston pushed for co-star Orson Welles to direct this late noir, nobody imagined it would emerge as one of the key works in the Welles canon despite being recut and partially reshot by Universal. His last Hollywood studio venture stacks up as probably Welles’ most popular picture although in 1958 it was dumped into theaters as a second feature. Here’s F.X. Feeney with a great breakdown of Welles’ technique in Touch of Evil. And while we’re on the subject of Orson, here’s “The Most Complete Investigation into the Making of Citizen Kane“.

The post Touch of Evil appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jack Gilardi, Longtime ICM Agent, Dies at 88

  • The Wrap
Jack Gilardi, a longtime ICM Partners agent whose license plate read “ICM Jg,” died on Thursday at his home in Los Angeles at age 88, the agency announced.

During his seven-decade career, Gilardi represented Hollywood legends such as Burt Reynolds, Sylvester Stallone, Jerry Lewis, Shirley MacLaine and Charlton Heston. Longstanding clients who have remained with him until the end include Ann-Margret, Joe Mantegna, Walter Hill, Frankie Avalon and Jaclyn Smith, among many others.

He was also married to actress and former Mouseketeer Annette Funicello from 1965 to 1981; the couple had three children together.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2019 (Photos)

The Chicago native got his start in talent representation while serving in the U.S. Army, where he was placed in charge of bringing entertainment to the soldiers stationed at Fort Knox. In October 1954, following his completion of service, he began working as an agent with General Artists Corporation, which later joined Creative Management Associates,
See full article at The Wrap »

Jack L. Gilardi Dies: Longtime ICM Partners Agent, Former Husband Of Annette Funicello Was 88

  • Deadline
Jack L. Gilardi, a longtime ICM Partners agent whose client roster over the years included Burt Reynolds, Sylvester Stallone, Jerry Lewis, Shirley MacLaine, and Charlton Heston, died this morning at age 88.

His death was announced by ICM Partners. No cause of death was given, but the company notes that Gilardi passed away peacefully in his sleep, surrounded by family.

Gilardi would have celebrated his 65th anniversary at the company next month. Longstanding clients who remained with Gilardi until the end include Ann-Margret, Joe Mantegna, Walter Hill, Frankie Avalon, and Jaclyn Smith, among others.

Among his early clients was former Mouseketeer and star of American-International’s “Beach Party” film franchise Annette Funicello, who he would marry in 1965. The couple had three children before divorcing in 1983. (Funicello died at 70 in 2013 of complications due to multiple sclerosis).

Born on October 5th, 1930 in Chicago, Illinois, Gilardi would go on to join the Us Army and,
See full article at Deadline »

Jack Gilardi, Longtime ICM Partners Agent, Dies at 88

  • Variety
Jack Gilardi, a longtime ICM Partners agent who represented such stars as Burt Reynolds, Sylvester Stallone, Jerry Lewis, Charlton Heston and Shirley MacLaine, died Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 88.

Gilardi was known for his gentlemanly style, love of the Los Angeles Dodgers and his skill at representing top actors. He would have marked his 65th anniversary at ICM (and its predecessor Creative Management Associates) next month. Gilardi remained active as a talent rep on behalf of longtime clients including Ann-Margret, Joe Mantegna, Walter Hill, Frankie Valli, Frankie Avalon and Jaclyn Smith. He was married to one-time client Annette Funicello for 17 years in the 1960s and ’70s.

A native of Chicago, Gilardi served in the U.S. Army at Fort Knox in Kentucky, where he was in charge of arranging entertainment for the soldiers. That led him to pursue a career as a talent agency after his discharge
See full article at Variety »

Film Review: ‘Rambo: Last Blood’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Rambo: Last Blood’
Home has always been an abstract concept for John Rambo, which is what the last scene of 2008’s otherwise expendable “Rambo” sequel finally gave the iconic Sylvester Stallone character: a moment when this unsettled Vietnam War survivor, looking very much the worse for wear, lumbers up to a mailbox bearing the character’s surname. At last, somewhere in Arizona, this dutybound embodiment of American military might had found his way back to the family ranch.

Such closure was in nearly every way antithetical to the spirit of “First Blood” — that is, the Ptsd-fueled franchise’s inaugural movie and the eponymous David Morrell novel that inspired it, both of which traded on the notion that a good man who’d gotten a taste of killing had serious difficulty turning off that deadly skill set upon his return. As a result, a sum total of zero viewers saw that ending as a
See full article at Variety »

Roland Emmerich Enlists An All-Star Cast In Thrilling ‘Midway’ Trailer

Director Roland Emmerich knows a thing or two about directing blockbusters, and in Midway he tackles World War Two with an A-list cast.

War films with a laundry list of movie stars were commonplace in Hollywood for decades, and the 1976 feature Midway starred Charlton Heston, Robert Mitchum, Henry Fonda and Toshiro Mifune.

This [...]

The post Roland Emmerich Enlists An All-Star Cast In Thrilling ‘Midway’ Trailer appeared first on Hollywood Outbreak.
See full article at Hollywood Outbreak »

Watching Tombstone at an Old West Ghost Town with Val Kilmer Was Amazing

  • MovieWeb
Watching Tombstone at an Old West Ghost Town with Val Kilmer Was Amazing
I often talk about how environment and being in the right mindset have so much to do with how one processes a movie. If one, for example, watches a horror movie at 2 in the afternoon with a bunch of sunlight in a room with no other people on a laptop, it's probably not going to play the same way that it would in a packed, dark movie theater. With that having been said, it's hard to imagine anything better than watching Tombstone, one of the finest westerns we have, at an actual old west ghost town with Doc Holliday himself, Val Kilmer in attendance. That's something I recently had the good fortune of experiencing and it was, quite simply, a real treat.

This was a recent screening put on by the Alamo Drafthouse as part of their Rolling Roadshow. Basically, movies are screened in a fitting environment with an experience
See full article at MovieWeb »

Andy Serkis Should Direct a Planet of the Apes Remake for Disney

  • MovieWeb
Andy Serkis Should Direct a Planet of the Apes Remake for Disney
I'm aware that headline is enough to make some people yell sacrilege and start from a place of simply, yet firmly, saying "no." But please, just hear me out. Andy Serkis headlined the recent Planet of the Apes trilogy, which followed Caesar on his epic journey and traced the origins of how the Earth came to be overrun with smart apes in the first place. Yet, after War for the Planet of the Apes, many were left to wonder, where do we go from here? I'm here to kindly suggest that it's finally time this series tackles the events of the original classic that started it all.

A little background on why now is the time to discuss this very topic. Disney finally completed its merger with Fox in March. Disney decided to ax most of Fox's development slate, but it was confirmed that they do intend to keep this particular franchise going.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Beauty Break: The Celebrity Portraiture of Phil Stern

by Nathaniel R

Happy Phil Stern Centennial! "who?" you say? Phil Stern, you philistines! He's one of the great Hollywood photographers. He lived a very long life, dying just 5 years ago at 95 years young but his work was largely before our time. We grew up with Herb Ritts and Annie Liebovitz as the biggest names in celebrity photoshoots but as long as Movie Stars have existed there have been artists behind the camera helping to mythologize them. Stern was one of those idolmakers taking several amazing photos of James Dean, Charlton Heston, Liz Taylor and many other important celebrities from the 20th century. Though celebrity portraits and candids weren't his only claim to fame having also been a war photographer. 

After the jump 14 other images from Stern's vast portfolio that we adore...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cecil B. DeMille movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Ten Commandments,’ ‘The King of Kings’

  • Gold Derby
Cecil B. DeMille movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Ten Commandments,’ ‘The King of Kings’
Cecil B. DeMille would’ve celebrated his 138th birthday on August 12, 2019. One of cinema’s earliest pioneers, the Oscar-winning director helmed 70 films throughout the silent and sound era. He made his mark in a number of genres, but was most famous for his spectacularly mounted biblical epics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest movies, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1881, DeMille made his directorial debut with “The Squaw Man” (1914), a story he remade in 1918 and 1931. He made dozens of silent films, including the ambitious biblical stories “The Ten Commandments” (1923) and “The King of Kings” (1927). He entered into the sound era with ease, earning his first Oscar nomination in Best Picture for the Claudette Colbert-headlined version of “Cleopatra” (1934).

SEECharlton Heston movies: Top 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

After a series of box office smashes, he took home the Best Picture
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cecil B. DeMille movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Cecil B. DeMille movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Cecil B. DeMille would’ve celebrated his 138th birthday on August 12, 2019. One of cinema’s earliest pioneers, the Oscar-winning director helmed 70 films throughout the silent and sound era. He made his mark in a number of genres, but was most famous for his spectacularly mounted biblical epics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest movies, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1881, DeMille made his directorial debut with “The Squaw Man” (1914), a story he remade in 1918 and 1931. He made dozens of silent films, including the ambitious biblical stories “The Ten Commandments” (1923) and “The King of Kings” (1927). He entered into the sound era with ease, earning his first Oscar nomination in Best Picture for the Claudette Colbert-headlined version of “Cleopatra” (1934).

After a series of box office smashes, he took home the Best Picture prize for his big top melodrama “The Greatest Show on Earth
See full article at Gold Derby »

It’s Wayne’s World Now at the NRA

Washington — Wayne Lapierre, the head of the National Rifle Association, increasingly looks like the last man standing at the powerful gun lobbying group.

Lapierre orchestrated the departures of Oliver North, the former NRA president who raised the alarm about questionable accounting under Lapierre’s watch, and Chris Cox, the former head of the gun group’s powerful political and lobbying groups. Mid-level employees who were not aligned with Lapierre have left the group or been shown the door. Late last week, Jennifer Baker, the longtime top communications aide for the NRA’s lobbying arm,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Fault Lines: How "Earthquake" Broke The Disaster Movie Rules...And Failed.

  • CinemaRetro
While criticism of Earthquake usually concentrates on its flaky Sensurround effects, the film’s more important flaws lie in a confused approach to the genre and – especially – one character who really belongs in a different movie altogether, writes Barnaby Page.

Although it remains one of the best-known of the early-1970s all-star disaster extravaganzas, Earthquake (1974) was less successful commercially than Airport, The Towering Inferno or The Poseidon Adventure, and did not enjoy the critical acclaim of the latter two.

It probably suffered in the short term from being released only a month before Inferno, and in the longer term from its over-reliance on the Sensurround system; watched now, though, it is flawed largely through discontinuity of tone and the uneasy co-existence of both a strong human villain and a natural threat. Still, the film casts interesting light on the genre as a whole, sometimes complying with its standards and sometimes departing from them.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Seven Things We Didn’t Learn in CNN’s Breezy Clip-Fest ‘The Movies: The Eighties’

Seven Things We Didn’t Learn in CNN’s Breezy Clip-Fest ‘The Movies: The Eighties’
CNN premiered the first episode in Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman’s six-part summer series “The Movies” Sunday night, 84 minutes devoted to the 1980s. Subsequent installments cover the 90s and post-2000 and then turn back to the 70s, 60s, and the bulk of core film history — 1930-1950 — crammed into the finale. Silent film, it seems, was not worth a mention.

First of all, this series is not targeted at erudite cinephiles who know their film history. Any self-respecting TCM watcher is too sophisticated for this breezy look at “The Movies.” Clearly the producers are trying to draw younger audiences who might be vaguely familiar with some of the movies here, from Steven Spielberg’s “E.T.” to Martin Scorsese’s “Raging Bull.” (Both directors are on hand to comment.) Snobby old Hollywood lovers sometimes forget that for today’s 18-year-old film fan devouring classic films made before they were born,
See full article at Indiewire »

William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Best Years of Our Lives,’ ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘Funny Girl’

  • Gold Derby
William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Best Years of Our Lives,’ ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘Funny Girl’
William Wyler would’ve celebrated his 117th birthday on July 1, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner crafted several classics during Hollywood’s Golden Age, adapting his style to a wide variety of genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1902 in Germany, Wyler immigrated to the U.S. when his cousin, Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle, hired him as an errand boy. He quickly moved up the ranks, directing shorts during the silent era before transitioning into features. It was with the advent of sound that he hit his stride, displaying an ear for dialogue that would serve him well in lofty literary adaptations produced by his longtime partner, independent mogul Samuel Goldwyn.

SEEBette Davis movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Wyler quickly became an Oscar mainstay, earning a record-breaking 12 nominations for Best Director: “Dodsworth
See full article at Gold Derby »

William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
William Wyler would’ve celebrated his 117th birthday on July 1, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner crafted several classics during Hollywood’s Golden Age, adapting his style to a wide variety of genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1902 in Germany, Wyler immigrated to the U.S. when his cousin, Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle, hired him as an errand boy. He quickly moved up the ranks, directing shorts during the silent era before transitioning into features. It was with the advent of sound that he hit his stride, displaying an ear for dialogue that would serve him well in lofty literary adaptations produced by his longtime partner, independent mogul Samuel Goldwyn.

Wyler quickly became an Oscar mainstay, earning a record-breaking 12 nominations for Best Director: “Dodsworth” (1936), “Wuthering Heights” (1939), “The Letter” (1940), “The Little Foxes” (1941), “Mrs. Miniver” (1942), “The Best Years of Our Lives
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Unfinished Films Of Producer Enzo Rispoli

  • CinemaRetro
Charlton Heston in the unseen epic "Genghis Khan: The Story of a Lifetime".

Cinema Retro's columnist Adrian Smith examines the fascinating tales behind the late producer Enzo Rispoli's troubled "dream productions" dealing with Genghis Khan and a classic Russian novel, "Quiet Flows the Don". Along the way, Rispoli had wooed such disparate talents as Ken Annakin, Charlton Heston, Ernest Borgnine, Sergei Bondarchuk and Marcello Mastroianni. However, the dissolution of the Soviet Union and an unsteady situation with finances led to severe problems with both productions. "Quiet Flows the Don" was ultimately transformed into a mini-series for Russian television after receiving the approval of President Putin but Rispoli's son Nicholas is attempting to create a version of the film that will be more suitable for international audiences. He also hopes to be able to source financing that will allow him to finish the Khan project as a six-part television
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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