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11 Movies Shot on Smart Phones, from ‘Tangerine’ to ‘High Flying Bird’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
11 Movies Shot on Smart Phones, from ‘Tangerine’ to ‘High Flying Bird’ (Photos)
Steven Soderbergh wasn’t the first filmmaker to shoot an entire movie on an iPhone, but with his latest film “High Flying Bird” he’s proved yet again that it’s totally possible to have a professional, beautiful looking movie filmed with something that fits in your pocket. Here are some other feature films and a few shorts that have made use of Apple’s flagship smartphone.

High Flying Bird” (2019)

Soderbergh shot “High Flying Bird” on an iPhone 8, which is now capable of filming in 4K resolution. The wealthy and bright realms of power atop expensive restaurants and skyscrapers for high-powered agents is far different than the mood Soderbergh was chasing on “Unsane,” but the film even has a sequence in which the action of a one-on-one basketball match isn’t captured on camera but by teenagers on, what else, their phones.

Unsane” (2018)

The first time Steven Soderbergh utilized an
See full article at The Wrap »

Doc/Fest panel discuss getting films funded, distributed

Simon Chinn (Man On Wire) joined by Dogwoof, Discovery and BBC execs.

A Sheffield Doc/Fest panel titled ‘How To Get Your Theatrical Doc Funded and Distributed saw industry heavyweights deliver a raft of advice.

Discovery Channel head of documentary and specials John Hoffman said every production company should be approachable “as you never know when the next great story will appear.”

Hoffman recalled his tenure as a producer at HBO, citing that no documentary was ever overlooked. Using the film Rape in a Small Town: The Florence Holway Story as an example, he recalled when Jeffrey and Charlene Chapman
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Top 50 modern movie documentaries

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50 fabulous documentary films, covering hard politics through to music, money and films that never were...

Thanks to streaming services such as Netflix, we’ve never had better access to documentaries. A whole new audience can discover that these real life stories are just as thrilling, entertaining, and incredible as the latest big-budget blockbuster. What’s more, they’re all true too. But with a new found glut of them comes the ever more impossible choice, what’s worth your time? Below is my pick of the 50 best modern feature length documentaries.

I’ve defined modern as being from 2000 onwards, which means some of the greatest documentaries ever made will not feature here. I’m looking at you Hoop Dreams.

50. McConkey (2013)

d. Rob Bruce, Scott Gaffney, Murray Wais, Steve Winter, David Zieff

Shane McConkey was an extreme skier and Base jumper who lived life on the edge, and very much to the full.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Brian Wilson’s Tour With Rodriguez Prompts Re-Release of ‘Searching for Sugar Man’

Brian Wilson’s Tour With Rodriguez Prompts Re-Release of ‘Searching for Sugar Man’
Sony Pictures Classics will re-release Malik Bendjelloul‘s Oscar-winning documentary “Searching for Sugar Man” in New York and Los Angeles this month as the film’s subject, rock musician Rodriguez, prepares to go on tour with Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys, the company announced Tuesday. “Searching for Sugar Man” will be shown for one week limited engagements beginning June 19 at the Laemmle Music Hall in Los Angeles and June 26 at the Village East Cinema in New York City. Rodriguez was discovered in a Detroit bar in the late 1960s by two celebrated producers who were struck by his soulful melodies.
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscars 2015: Live Blog

  • ScreenDaily
Oscars 2015: Live Blog
All the winners from Sunday’s 87th Academy Awards.

Show host Harris signs off with a chirpy, “Buenos noches!”

Sean Penn walks on. It’s time for the big one. Best film. Will it be Birdman or Boyhood? It’s Birdman! The movie ends the night tied with The Grand Budapest Hotel on four Oscars. Inarritu, referring to his pal Alfonso Cuaron who enjoyed success with Gravity at last year’s show, says, “Two Mexicans in a row. That’s suspicious, I guess.” Slightly more seriously, Agi also calls on his fellow Mexicans to help build a strong future for his beloved country. Wow, a good night for Birdman and a surprisingly barren one for Boyhood. Pirates indeed, Ethan Hawke, but glorious pirates.

And now Matthew McConaughey saunters on stage to announce best actress. Julianne Moore, five times a nominee at the Oscars is the favourite. Will she get it this time for Still Alice? Yes she’s got
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Takeaways From THR's Cover Story on Late Filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul

Takeaways From THR's Cover Story on Late Filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul
Earlier this week, The Hollywood Reporter published a comprehensive piece that takes a look at the final days of "Searching for Sugar Man" director Malik Bendjelloul. Bendjelloul took his life in early May, a little more than a year after he won an Oscar for his documentary about American musician Sixto Rodriguez. THR (and arguably most glossy publications) don't usually lead in with cover stories about documentary filmmakers, but the multi-talented director's tragic death has warranted such a profile. Read More: Report: Malik Bendjelloul, 'Searching for Sugar Man' Director, Committed Suicide The article includes a brief biography, snippets of conversations with some of Bendjelloul's closest friends and colleagues and, perhaps most unfortunately, a glimpse at the decline of the director's mental health. In honor of his life and THR's thorough article, Indiewire has decided to put together a piece that highlights some things you probably didn't know about the filmmaker.
See full article at Indiewire »

Takeaways From THR's Cover Story on Late Filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul

Takeaways From THR's Cover Story on Late Filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul
Earlier this week, The Hollywood Reporter published a comprehensive piece that takes a look at the final days of "Searching for Sugar Man" director Malik Bendjelloul. Bendjelloul took his life in early May, a little more than a year after he won an Oscar for his documentary about American musician Sixto Rodriguez. THR (and arguably most glossy publications) don't usually lead in with cover stories about documentary filmmakers, but the multi-talented director's tragic death has warranted such a profile. Read More: Report: Malik Bendjelloul, 'Searching for Sugar Man' Director, Committed Suicide The article includes a brief biography, snippets of conversations with some of Bendjelloul's closest friends and colleagues and, perhaps most unfortunately, a glimpse at the decline of the director's mental health. In honor of his life and THR's thorough article, Indiewire has decided to put together a piece that highlights some things you probably didn't know about the filmmaker.
See full article at Indiewire »

Required Reading: An Oscar Winner’s Suicide and Tarantino’s Blocks

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya? “A Community Grows in Texas: The 2014 Atx Television Festival” — Libby Hill at RogerEbert.com focuses in on a successful young fest celebrating the small screen. “Oscar to Suicide in One Year: Tracing the Searching For Sugar Man Director’s Tragic Final Days” — Scott Johnson at THR travels to Sweden to speak with Malik Bendjelloul’s friends to better understand an Oscar-winning perfectionist and the early death of a promising young storyteller. “When reporters asked Johar whether success had contributed to his brother’s demise, Johar replied, “He was a very straightforward person when it came to success,” he said. “Admirably earthy and relaxed. Unimaginably relaxed about [his] successes, I cannot see any such links.” But while Bendjelloul might have put on a good face, the toll of success might have been greater than even
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Sheffield Doc/Fest 2014: Finding Fela Review

  • HeyUGuys
Alex Gibney’s joint ventures into music and politics in recent years continues with a new biopic of legendary Nigerian Afrobeat musician, and steadfast activist, Fela Kuti. Peddling out of The Armstrong Lie, Gibney turns his attention to Bill T. Jones’ Broadway musical Fela!, twinning it with archival and borrowed footage to lead us on an equally heart-racing journey. Finding Fela has the makings of a classic music biopic: as thorough and soulful as Kevin Macdonald’s Marley, thrilling as Scorsese’s The Last Waltz all those years ago, or more recently Morgan Neville’s euphoric 20 Feet From Stardom, but follows an irresistible character in the same way Malik Bendjelloul’s Searching For Sugar Man did.

As with so many celebrated black singers, Kuti’s origins were humble: the Church was where his music career started. History often dictates the lives of these icons however; Kuti was soon politicised through
See full article at HeyUGuys »

How to Win an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature (or At Least Have a Shot at It)

How to Win an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature (or At Least Have a Shot at It)
Of course, anyone who tells you they know the secret to winning an Oscar is lying because there is no one guaranteed path to the Academy Awards, but as the panelists at yesterday's "The Race for the Documentary Oscar" session at Sheffield Doc/Fest acknowledged, there are some fast paths to get there. In a panel featuring Philippa Kowarsky, founding and managing director of Cinephil, a sales and co-productions company ("The Gatekeepers," "The Act of Killing"), Academy-award winning producer Simon Chinn ("Man on Wire," "Searching for Sugar Man") and Nick Fraser, commissioning editor, BBC Storyville ("Man on Wire"), the discussion ranged from the cost of qualifying theatrical runs, the value of a publicist and other considerations for an Oscar run. After a clip from "Searching for Sugar Man," which Chinn produced, he took a moment to acknowledge the recent tragic loss of the film's director Malik Bendjelloul.  "It's very difficult
See full article at Indiewire »

Producer pays tribute to Sugar Man director

  • ScreenDaily
Producer pays tribute to Sugar Man director
Producers at Sheffield Doc/Fest talk about Oscars race for documentaries.

Producer Simon Chinn paid tribute to Malik Bendjelloul, the 36-year-old director of Oscar winning documentary Searching For Sugar Man who died in May, at a panel which took place during Sheffield’s Doc/Fest (June 9).

Sitting on the panel entitled “The Race For the Documentary Oscar,” Chinn described the moment the young Swedish director walked into his office with the idea for Searching for Sugar Man.

“He completely won me over, he was a wonderful, infectious enthusiast and he had this story that he thought could go all the way. I remember in our first meeting he uttered the word Oscar,” said Chinn, who added that he would “like to dedicate my contribution today to Malik’s memory.” [He is pictured with Bendjelloul on the night of their Oscar win.]

Also on the Doc/Fest panel were Israeli distributor Cinephil’s Philippa Kowarsky, which was behind this year’s divisive Oscar nominated documentary The Act of Killing and 2012 shortlisted
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Reality Checks: Four Major Documentary Filmmakers Have Died This Year. These Are Their Legacies.

Reality Checks: Four Major Documentary Filmmakers Have Died This Year. These Are Their Legacies.
It always sucks when someone dies. But in the small world of documentary filmmaking, where the directors are a close-knit, dogged group, traveling to the same events and sharing the same few resources to tell their often personal or passionate stories, the loss of a fellow intrepid traveler cuts deep. It’s like losing a member of your extended family. The last six months have been particularly tough on the international nonfiction community, with the passings of Ed Pincus, Peter Wintonick, Michael Glawogger, and Malik Bendjelloul. The loss of just one of these filmmakers provides plenty to mourn, but the death of four beloved directors within a short time is cause for serious pause. Not only will the documentary community miss out on their future projects, it also loses their voices: creative, intellectual, and in some cases, rabble-rousing, these were filmmakers who were defined as much by their outstanding work as their character.
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: An Interview with Searching For Sugar Man Director Malik Bendjelloul

Thanks to director Darius Devas for emailing us about his interview from SXSW 2012 with Malik Bendjelloul, the late director of Searching For Sugar Man. In this five-minute interview, a thoroughly engaged Bendjelloul talks about finding his story, constructing a narrative that builds from one “and then” moment to another, and the human brain’s close resemblance to a chimpanzee’s.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Watch: An Interview with Searching For Sugar Man Director Malik Bendjelloul

Thanks to director Darius Devas for emailing us about his interview from SXSW 2012 with Malik Bendjelloul, the late director of Searching For Sugar Man. In this five-minute interview, a thoroughly engaged Bendjelloul talks about finding his story, constructing a narrative that builds from one “and then” moment to another, and the human brain’s close resemblance to a chimpanzee’s.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Cannes: Sugar Man Distributor on Director Malik Bendjelloul’s Suicide: ‘He Couldn't Find Another Story’

Cannes: Sugar Man Distributor on Director Malik Bendjelloul’s Suicide: ‘He Couldn't Find Another Story’
Despite all the star power flowing through the streets and screening rooms of Cannes, one of the most overwhelming stories in these first few days has been the news of the death (by suicide, according to family) of 36-year old Malik Bendjelloul, director of the Oscar-winning documentary Searching for Sugar Man. Many of the filmmakers and journalists here at Cannes, including myself, followed the journey of that movie, about Bendjelloul's search for Sixto Rodriguez, a '70s Detroit rocker who'd released one transcendent album and then disappeared. Bendjelloul ran out of money during filming and finished the movie on his iPhone. His storytelling was so personal and gripping that when Rodriguez himself walked out — alive! — after the Sundance premiere, I started screaming involuntarily, like the Beatles had just gotten back together. At every press conference here in Cannes, journalists from Bendjelloul's native Sweden have asked for comment from directors and
See full article at Vulture »

Sugar Man to get Cannes screening

Sugar Man to get Cannes screening
Free screening in tribute to Oscar-winning director Malik Bendjelloul.

Protagonist Pictures and the Swedish Film Institute are to host a screening of Searching for Sugar Man in Cannes as a tribute to director Malik Bendjelloul who died this week.

The free screening is scheduled to take place this Sunday (May 18) at 9.30am in Cinema Star 1. 

The 36-year-old Swedish director, who committed suicide at his home in Stockholm this week, won a host of awards for his remarkable story of singer Rodriguez, including the Oscar for Best Documentary Feature and the BAFTA for Best Documentary Film.

Protagonist Pictures handled international sales for the film. 
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Searching for Sugar Man director Malik Bendjelloul committed suicide

Searching for Sugar Man director Malik Bendjelloul committed suicide
Searching for Sugar Man director Malik Bendjelloul committed suicide, his family have confirmed.

Stockholm police found Bendjelloul at his home in the city on Tuesday (May 13) .

Bendjelloul's brother Johar told local newspaper the Aftonbladet that his sibling had struggled with depression and took his own life.

"Life isn't always easy. I was with him all the time towards the end. I don't know how to handle this. I just don't know," he said.

Bendjelloul's family have asked for privacy in order to grieve.

Searching for Sugar Man, about the life and career of American singer Sixto Rodriguez, won the Best Documentary Oscar in 2013.

Bendjelloul also won the 2013 BAFTA, Director's Guild of America, Producer's Guild of America, Writer's Guild of America, American Cinema Editors and the 2012 International Documentary Association awards for the movie.

He appeared on TV as a child and produced music documentaries for Swedish television as well as worked as a TV reporter.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Brother: 'Searching for Sugar Man' director Malik Bendjelloul's death was a suicide

  • Hitfix
Brother: 'Searching for Sugar Man' director Malik Bendjelloul's death was a suicide
Stockholm (AP) — Malik Bendjelloul, the Swedish director of the acclaimed "Searching for Sugar Man" documentary, was widely known for his enthusiasm, kindness and high spirits — so the news Wednesday that he had taken his own life shocked colleagues around the world. Bendjelloul's brother Johar Bendjelloul confirmed to The Associated Press that his 36-year-old younger brother committed suicide Tuesday. He told daily Aftonbladet that his brother had struggled with depression for a short period. "Life is not always simple," Johar Bendjelloul was quoted as saying, adding that receiving the message that his brother had committed suicide was the worst thing he had ever experienced. "I don't know how to handle it. I don't know," he said. Police would not comment on the cause of death but said they suspected no foul play. Bendjelloul rose to international fame in 2013 when his debut feature film, "Searching for Sugar Man," won an Oscar for best documentary.
See full article at Hitfix »

Searching For Sugar Man Director Malik Bendjelloul Dead At 36

Malik Bendjelloul is best known to the general public as the director of the Oscar-winning documentary Searching For Sugar Man. To those who actually knew him, however, he was a nice, determined guy with a passionate spirit and a zest for life. Many were hopeful, after a few more brilliant documentaries, that the rest of the world might get to know that fun-loving guy too, but sadly, that.s never going to happen. Bendjelloul was found dead this week. He was only 36. What exactly happened is still unclear, but his brother told a local Swedish outlet that he took his own life following a "short depression". Beyond that, almost nothing is known, except that the family is devastated about what happened. According to The Daily Mail, Bendjellou grew up as the son of a painter and a translator in Sweden. He went to school to become a journalist and later
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Searching for Sugar Man Director Malik Bendjelloul Committed Suicide, Brother Confirms

Searching for Sugar Man Director Malik Bendjelloul Committed Suicide, Brother Confirms
Malik Bendjelloul's cause of death has been revealed. The Oscar-winning director of Searching for Sugar Man committed suicide, the Swedish filmmaker's brother Johar Bendjelloul confirmed to Swedish media. "I can confirm that it was suicide and that he had been depressed for a short period of time," Bendjelloul's brother told tabloid Aftonbladet (via the Daily Mail)."Life is not always so easy...It's the worst. I don't know how to handle it." Bendjelloul was only 36 when he took his own life this week. Bendjelloul was found dead in Stockholm on Tuesday. Police didn't immediately confirm where he was found or his cause of death. Searching for Sugar Man,...
See full article at E! Online »
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