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Blu-ray Review: The House That Dripped Blood Pours on Nostalgia

Like Hammer Films (most affectionately known as Hammer Horror), Amicus Productions was based in England and among other genres, specialized in gothic horror films with plenty of atmosphere and excellent ensemble casts. These movies have a palpable feel and flavor, and are much-beloved by fans such as myself.  This is why I'm happy to say that Scream Factory has knocked it out of the park yet again with their Blu-ray release of Amicus' The House That Dripped Blood, out on Blu-ray today. It's one of those anthology horror films of a certain delicious vintage that's just so much fun. Starring a fantastic cast of British actors, such as Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, Ingrid Pitt, Jon Pertwee, Joanna Dunham, Nyree Dawn Porter, and Denholm ElliottThe House...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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Drive-In Dust Offs: The House That Dripped Blood (1971)

From the mid sixties to the mid seventies, omnibus (or anthology, or portmanteau if you’re really fancy) horror films were big business. And Amicus Productions ruled the roost. Between ’65 and ’74 they released seven such films, starting with Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (not to be confused with Dr. Tongue’s Evil House of Pancakes) and culminating with From Beyond the Grave. Today’s film lands in the middle, The House that Dripped Blood (1971) showcasing a company just starting to hit their stride with anthologies.

Popularity of the omnibus format has ebbed and flowed throughout the last 50 years; after Amicus stopped making them, George Romero and Stephen King collaborated on one of the finest, Creepshow (1982), which didn’t so much kick start a revival as have everyone afraid to compete. Throughout the late ‘80s and ‘90s there were pockets of inspiration, Tales from the Hood (1995) and of course HBO
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Daily | Passages | Stern, Sugawara, Leñero

"Photographer Phil Stern, who was responsible for some of the most intimate portraits of Hollywood stars, including Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, John Wayne, Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart, died Saturday," reports Shelli Weinstein for Variety. "He was 95." We also note the passing of Japanese actor Bunta Sugawara, star of Kinji Fukasaku's Battles Without Honor and Humanity; novelist, journalist, playwright and screenwriter Vicente Leñero; actresses Joanna Dunham and Mary Ann Mobley; and actors Deven Verma and Ken Weatherwax. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Passages | Stern, Sugawara, Leñero

"Photographer Phil Stern, who was responsible for some of the most intimate portraits of Hollywood stars, including Marilyn Monroe, James Dean, John Wayne, Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart, died Saturday," reports Shelli Weinstein for Variety. "He was 95." We also note the passing of Japanese actor Bunta Sugawara, star of Kinji Fukasaku's Battles Without Honor and Humanity; novelist, journalist, playwright and screenwriter Vicente Leñero; actresses Joanna Dunham and Mary Ann Mobley; and actors Deven Verma and Ken Weatherwax. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Joanna Dunham, star of The Greatest Story Ever Told, dies aged 78

Joanna Dunham has died, aged 78.

The British actress passed away on November 25, according to an obituary in The Guardian.

Dunham was perhaps best known for her role as Mary Magdalene in the 1965 Hollywood blockbuster The Greatest Story Ever Told.

She was recommended to director George Stevens for the role by Marilyn Monroe, who had seen her performance on stage in Romeo and Juliet in 1962.

The biblical epic, which also starred Max von Sydow as Jesus and Charlton Heston as John the Baptist, was nominated for five Academy Awards in 1966.

She had a successful career in film, television and theatre, and later focused her time on painting.

Dunham created a gallery in a converted farm building and mounted numerous exhibitions there, as well as having exhibits at the New English Art Club in London and the Royal Society of Portrait Painters.

Dunham is survived by her husband, children and five grandchildren.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Joanna Dunham obituary

Stage and screen actor who played Mary Magdalene in the 1965 film The Greatest Story Ever Told and appeared in several popular TV dramas of the 1970s

The actor Joanna Dunham, who has died aged 78, played Mary Magdalene in the Hollywood blockbuster The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), directed by George Stevens, with Max von Sydow as Jesus and Charlton Heston as Pontius Pilate. She had been recommended to Stevens for the role by Marilyn Monroe, who had seen her performance as Juliet on tour with the Old Vic in New York in 1962, after she had taken over from Judi Dench in Franco Zeffirelli’s production.

Her stage career, confined mainly to the 1960s and 70s, included the occasional indelible role, such as Perdita in Frank Marcus’s comedy of adultery and free love, The Formation Dancers (1964), in the West End of London, co-starring Maxine Audley and Robin Bailey; her irresistible young
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Chance to Check Out Heston Directing Self in 'Man" Remake

Charlton Heston movies: ‘A Man for All Seasons’ remake, ‘The Greatest Story Ever Told’ (photo: Charlton Heston as Ben-Hur) (See previous post: “Charlton Heston: Moses Minus Staff Plus Chariot Equals Ben-Hur.”) I’ve yet to watch Irving Rapper’s melo Bad for Each Other (1954), co-starring the sultry Lizabeth Scott — always a good enough reason to check out any movie, regardless of plot or leading man. A major curiosity is the 1988 made-for-tv version of A Man for All Seasons, with Charlton Heston in the Oscar-winning Paul Scofield role (Sir Thomas More) and on Fred Zinnemann’s director’s chair. Vanessa Redgrave, who plays Thomas More’s wife in the TV movie (Wendy Hiller in the original) had a cameo as Anne Boleyn in the 1966 film. According to the IMDb, Robert Bolt, who wrote the Oscar-winning 1966 movie (and the original play), is credited for the 1988 version’s screenplay as well. Also of note,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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