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Clement Plays More Games in Bizarre Rider on the Rain (1970) | Blu-ray Review

For a bizarre psychosexual early-70s oddity ripe for rediscovery, look no further than Renè Clément’s 1970 title Rider on the Rain, adapted from a novel by underrated genre writer Sebastian Japrisot and headlined by Charles Bronson and Marlène Jobert in an unexpectedly twisted game of Hitchcockian cat and mouse. Purportedly, the film inspired Jim Morrison to write “Riders on the Storm,” (although this remains unsubstantiated) and the title nabbed a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

The narrative opens with a Lewis Carroll quote before introducing us to Mellie (Jobert), whose real name is Melancolie and lives in the South of France with her Italian husband (Gabriele Tinti), an overbearing pilot often away from home.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

25 underrated political dramas

Rebecca Clough Jan 20, 2017

As America gets its new President, we look at some excellent political drama films that may have slipped under your radar...

Political dramas can be entertaining, informative and even educational, opening up debates and offering new points of view. (When experiencing a year of tumultuous change like the one we’ve just had, they can also be a comforting reminder that, no matter what your situation, it could always be worse...) With the full whack of corruption, war, and conspiracy, here are 25 political dramas which deserve to be better known.

See related 25 underrated political thrillers 17 new TV shows to watch in 2017 Taboo episode 3 review The Girl On The Train review 25. The Marchers/La Marche (2013)

When teenager Mohamed (Tewfik Jallab) is shot by police, his friends want revenge, but he has a better idea: peaceful protest. Marching from Marseille to Paris, they band together with quite an assortment of characters along the way.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ingenious Godard Came up with Solution for Greece Debt Crisis: Why Is No One Listening?

Jean-Luc Godard in his youthful days. Jean-Luc Godard solution for the Greek debt crisis: 'Therefore' copyright payments A few years ago, Nouvelle Vague filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard, while plugging his Film Socialisme, chipped in with a surefire solution for the seemingly endless – and bottomless – Greek debt crisis. In July 2011, Godard told The Guardian's Fiachra Gibbons: The Greeks gave us logic. We owe them for that. It was Aristotle who came up with the big 'therefore'. As in, 'You don't love me any more, therefore ...' Or, 'I found you in bed with another man, therefore ...' We use this word millions of times, to make our most important decisions. It's about time we started paying for it. If every time we use the word therefore, we have to pay 10 euros to Greece, the crisis will be over in one day, and the Greeks will not have to sell the Parthenon to the Germans.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Penn Is Latest Hollywood Celeb to Take Home French Academy's Honor

Sean Penn: Honorary César goes Hollywood – again (photo: Sean Penn in '21 Grams') Sean Penn, 54, will receive the 2015 Honorary César (César d'Honneur), the French Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Crafts has announced. That means the French Academy's powers-that-be are once again trying to make the Prix César ceremony relevant to the American media. Their tactic is to hand out the career award to a widely known and relatively young – i.e., media friendly – Hollywood celebrity. (Scroll down for more such examples.) In the words of the French Academy, Honorary César 2015 recipient Sean Penn is a "living legend" and "a stand-alone icon in American cinema." It has also hailed the two-time Best Actor Oscar winner as a "mythical actor, a politically active personality and an exceptional director." Penn will be honored at the César Awards ceremony on Feb. 20, 2015. Sean Penn movies Sean Penn movies range from the teen comedy
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Eva Green Facts: 27 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the 'Sin City' Star

Eva Green never let her role as a Bond Girl typecast her, and, today, the actress is working more than ever.

After getting her start in an erotic Bertolucci film and breaking out in 2005's "Casino Royale," Green has played one captivating role after another. She was a standout in Tim Burton's poorly received "Dark Shadows" (2012) opposite Johnny Depp and is currently earning rave reviews for her mysterious and supernaturally-charged Vanessa in Showtime's "Penny Dreadful." This summer, she can be found as the sexy and manipulative Ava in Frank Miller's "Sin City: A Dame to Kill For."

From her famous relatives to her connection to President Nicolas Sarkozy, here are 27 things you probably don't know about Eva Green.

1. Eva Gaëlle Green was born July 6, 1980 in Paris, France to Marlène Jobert, a French actress, and Walter Green, a dentist.

2. Her last name is pronounced "grain" and is derived from the Swedish word "gren,
See full article at Moviefone »

Romance and Randomness, French Style, with ‘We Won’t Grow Old Together’ and ‘Favorites of the Moon’

Most home video releases are mass produced and marketed by faceless conglomerates interested only in separating you from your hard-earned cash. If you look closely though you’ll find smaller labels who love movies as much as you do and show it by delivering quality Blu-rays and DVDs of beloved films and cult classics, often loaded with special features, new transfers, and more. But yes, they still want your cash, too. Several labels go after obvious past classics, but some have made a habit of delivering films most of us have never heard of before. Kino Classics and Cohen Film Collection release their share of recognizable titles — Metropolis and Intolerance for example — but they don’t shy away from lesser known films choosing instead to champion them and prevent them from fading into oblivion. Both labels reached into French cinema’s past this week to find two very different movies. Keep
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Eva Green interview: Playing evil

Eva Green rose to fame as the Bond girl who won the heart of 007 in Casino Royale. Now she's back in more familiar territory as the elemental, mysterious Morgan in Camelot, she tells Elizabeth Day – dabbling in witchcraft and reinventing nudity

It is a sunny, blue-sky day when I meet the actress Eva Green. The London streets are peppered with cherry blossom and the heady scent of fake tan hangs thickly above the city like ozone. It is a day for white linen and flowing dresses and flip-flops. But when Green arrives, it is clear that she is not embracing the joys of spring time. Her tiny frame is swathed in black and dark grey and she is wearing a heavy coat over a lace blouse, jeans and boots. The pale flawlessness of her face is accentuated by jet-black hair and smudged eye-shadow the colour of coal dust. The overall
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Eva Green interview: Playing evil

Eva Green rose to fame as the Bond girl who won the heart of 007 in Casino Royale. Now she's back in more familiar territory as the elemental, mysterious Morgan in Camelot, she tells Elizabeth Day – dabbling in witchcraft and reinventing nudity

It is a sunny, blue-sky day when I meet the actress Eva Green. The London streets are peppered with cherry blossom and the heady scent of fake tan hangs thickly above the city like ozone. It is a day for white linen and flowing dresses and flip-flops. But when Green arrives, it is clear that she is not embracing the joys of spring time. Her tiny frame is swathed in black and dark grey and she is wearing a heavy coat over a lace blouse, jeans and boots. The pale flawlessness of her face is accentuated by jet-black hair and smudged eye-shadow the colour of coal dust. The overall
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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