Edmond O'Brien (I) - News Poster

News

Seven Days In May

Seven Days In May
As Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas tighten the screws in a life and death face-off between a traitorous general and his whistle-blowing aide, John Frankenheimer keeps upping the ante in this brilliantly directed political thriller scripted by Rod Serling in 1964. Good-guy politicos Fredric March and Edmond O’Brien push back against the gathering storm while conspirators Whit Bissell and Hugh Marlowe keep adding fuel to the fire.

The post Seven Days In May appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Monstrosity (The Atomic Brain)

How can a ‘Z’ horror production so completely absorb the thoughts of this ex- film student? This maladroit 1963 monster mash can’t even tell when it’s doing something good. A capable cast gives their all to a marginal production that, re-titled as The Atomic Brain, became a staple on late-nite TV, where it worked better than a sleeping pill. For extras, the quality disc production taps the one mortal willing to research this film’s murky depths: who else but Tom Weaver, whose original interview research actually makes sense of this screwy picture. Well, a little sense, at least.

Monstrosity

Blu-ray

Moth, Inc / Something Weird

1963 / Color / 1:85 widescreen + 1:33 open matte full frame / 65 min. / The Atomic Brain / Street Date 2018, 2019? / 24.99

Starring: Erika Peters, Judy Bamber, Marjorie Eaton, Frank Gerstle, Frank Fowler, Lisa Lang, Margie Fisco.

Cinematography: Alfred Taylor

Film Editor: Owen C. Gladden

Makeup: Lou Yates

Electrical effects: Kenneth Strickfaden
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Brad Pitt has entered the Golden Globe record books (twice) with his supporting actor win

Brad Pitt has entered the Golden Globe record books (twice) with his supporting actor win
As heavily predicted, Brad Pitt won Best Supporting Actor at Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards for Quentin Tarantino‘s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, and with it, he’s claimed two records.

Pitt, who took home this award for “12 Monkeys” (1995), is the sixth person to win this category a record two times. The 24-year spread between his twin wins is also the longest as none of the previous five had more than a decade between their bookend supporting Globes.

Here are the other two-time champs:

1. Richard Attenborough, “The Sand Pebbles” (1966) and “Doctor Dolittle” (1967)

2. Edmund Gwenn, “Miracle of 34th Street” (1947) and “Mister 880” (1950)

3. Martin Landau, “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” (1988) and “Ed Wood” (1994)

4. Edmond O’Brien, “The Barefoot Contessa” (1954) and “Seven Days in May” (1964)

5. Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

See Golden Globes: Complete list of winners in all 25 categories

Of the quintet, only Attenborough failed to get corresponding Oscar nominations.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Golden Globe predictions: Brad Pitt has a record-setting supporting actor win on lock

Golden Globe predictions: Brad Pitt has a record-setting supporting actor win on lock
The Best Supporting Actor Golden Globe is Brad Pitt‘s to lose. The “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” star has a commanding lead at 16/5 odds to take home award, which would be a record-setting 24 years after his first one for “Twelve Monkeys” (1995).

Pitt would also tie the category record for most wins at two, joining Edmund Gwenn (1947’s “Miracle of 34th Street” and 1950’s “Mister 880”), Edmond O’Brien (1954’s The Barefoot Contessa” and 1964’s “Seven Days in May”), Richard Attenborough (1966’s “The Sand Pebbles” and 1967’s “Doctor Dolittle”), Martin Landau (1988’s “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” and 1994’s “Ed Wood”) and Christoph Waltz (2009’s “Inglourious Basterds” and 2012’s “Django Unchained”). All five won their two Globes within a span of 10 years, with Attenborough being the only back-to-back winner.

See ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ production designer Barbara Ling on recreating classic Hollywood [Exclusive Video Interview]

A three-time nominee in the category,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Trapped (1949)

Noir Nirvana isn’t found amid literary swells and hoity-toity art connoisseurs — but in the trenches of humble Eagle-Lion Films, where Richard Fleischer, Lloyd Bridges and a hotter-than-hot Barbara Payton steamed up the streets of Los Angeles circa 1949. The Film Noir Foundation experts give us an expertly curated slice of hardboiled crime — Eddie Muller dubs it ‘To Live and Die in L.A.,’ but in the year that the Reds took over mainland China, and the Ussr exploded its first Atom bomb.

Trapped

Blu-ray + DVD

Flicker Alley

1949 / B&w / 1:37 Academy / 78 min. / Street Date December 17, 2019 / 39.98

Starring: Lloyd Bridges, Barbara Payton, John Hoyt, James Todd, Russ Conway, Robert Karnes, Stephen Chase, Tommy Noonan, Douglas Spencer.

Cinematography: Guy Roe

Film Editor: Alfred DeGaetano

Original Music: Sol Kaplan

Written by Earl Felton, George Zuckerman

Produced by Bryan Foy

Directed by Richard Fleischer

The Film Noir Foundation has done it again — the non-profit has
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Brad Pitt is aiming to tie this Golden Globe record with a win for ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’

Brad Pitt is aiming to tie this Golden Globe record with a win for ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’
The Golden Globes was the first major awards show to recognize Brad Pitt, giving him a Best Drama Actor nomination for “Legends of the Fall” (1994) and then awarding him Best Supporting Actor the next year for “12 Monkeys” (1995). He’s the odds-on favorite to claim a second statuette for “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” which would tie him for the most wins in the category.

The Globes hardly does repeat champs here, so just five actors have won two supporting actor Golden Globes:

1. Richard Attenborough, “The Sand Pebbles” (1966) and “Doctor Dolittle” (1967)

2. Edmund Gwenn, “Miracle of 34th Street” (1947) and “Mister 880” (1950)

3. Martin Landau, “Tucker: The Man and His Dream” (1988) and “Ed Wood” (1994)

4. Edmond O’Brien, “The Barefoot Contessa” (1954) and “Seven Days in May” (1964)

5. Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

Of the quintet, only Attenborough failed to get corresponding Oscar nominations. Three went on to win the Oscar for one of their
See full article at Gold Derby »

June 25th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Night Of The Creeps and The Green Inferno Collector’s Editions, American Horror Project Volume 2, The New York Ripper Limited Edition

It’s a big week for horror and sci-fi home media releases, as we have some stellar collections coming our way this Tuesday. Scream Factory is set to thrill fans with their Collector’s Edition of Night of the Creeps, and as if that wasn’t enough, Eli Roth’s The Green Inferno is also getting the Collector’s Edition treatment, and they’ve put together a Blu for Monster on the Campus as well.

Arrow Video has compiled the second installment of their American Horror Project box set series that cult film fans will undoubtedly want to add to their collections, Blue Underground is celebrating The New York Ripper with a 3-Disc Limited Edition set, and Severin Films is resurrecting The Beast in Heat on both Blu and DVD, too.

Other releases for June 25th include The Believers, Night Killer, Ctrl, The Dark Side of the Moon and Isabelle.
See full article at DailyDead »

Full Release Details for Arrow Video’s American Horror Project Volume 2 Blu-ray Box Set

Shedding a light on forgotten films from the horror genre's hallowed past, Arrow Video's American Horror Project Volume 1 was one of the most essential and exciting Blu-ray releases in 2016, and this June, Arrow Video is bringing more under-seen fright flicks into the much-deserved spotlight with the American Horror Project Volume 2 Blu-ray box set.

Coming out on June 25th, the American Horror Project Volume 2 Blu-ray box set will include 1970's Dream No Evil, 1976's Dark August, and 1977's The Child. Full release details and cover art are below, and to learn more, visit Mvd Entertainment Group's website.

"Continuing its mission to unearth the very best in weird and wonderful horror obscura from the golden age of Us independent genre moviemaking, Arrow Video is proud to present the long-awaited second volume in its American Horror Project series co-curated by author Stephen Thrower (Nightmare USA: The Untold Story of the Exploitation Independents
See full article at DailyDead »

Jack N. Young, Stuntman Who Doubled for Clark Gable, Dies at 91

Jack N. Young, Stuntman Who Doubled for Clark Gable, Dies at 91
Jack N. Young, a Navy frogman turned stuntman who stood in for Richard Widmark in Slattery's Hurricane, for Rock Hudson in Winchester '73 and for look-alike Clark Gable in the legendary actor's final film, The Misfits, has died. He was 91.

Young died Sept. 12 in Tucson, Arizona, his son, University of Arizona film professor Cody Young, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Young also doubled for Edmond O'Brien in D.O.A. (1949), and his résumé as a stuntman includes the John Wayne films She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), Rio Grande (1950), Hondo (1953), ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century

From Mad Method Actor to Humankind Advocate: One of the Greatest Film Actors of the 20th Century
Updated: Following a couple of Julie London Westerns*, Turner Classic Movies will return to its July 2017 Star of the Month presentations. On July 27, Ronald Colman can be seen in five films from his later years: A Double Life, Random Harvest (1942), The Talk of the Town (1942), The Late George Apley (1947), and The Story of Mankind (1957). The first three titles are among the most important in Colman's long film career. George Cukor's A Double Life earned him his one and only Best Actor Oscar; Mervyn LeRoy's Random Harvest earned him his second Best Actor Oscar nomination; George Stevens' The Talk of the Town was shortlisted for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. All three feature Ronald Colman at his very best. The early 21st century motto of international trendsetters, from Venezuela's Nicolás Maduro and Turkey's Recep Erdogan to Russia's Vladimir Putin and the United States' Donald Trump, seems to be, The world is reality TV and reality TV
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

TCM goes to war on Memorial Day: But thorny issues mostly avoided

Submarine movie evening: Underwater war waged in TCM's Memorial Day films In the U.S., Turner Classic Movies has gone all red, white, and blue this 2017 Memorial Day weekend, presenting a few dozen Hollywood movies set during some of the numerous wars in which the U.S. has been involved around the globe during the last century or so. On Memorial Day proper, TCM is offering a submarine movie evening. More on that further below. But first it's good to remember that although war has, to put it mildly, serious consequences for all involved, it can be particularly brutal on civilians – whether male or female; young or old; saintly or devilish; no matter the nationality, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other label used in order to, figuratively or literally, split apart human beings. Just this past Sunday, the Pentagon chief announced that civilian deaths should be anticipated as “a
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Netflix Will Finish and Release Orson Welles' Final Movie

Netflix continues to prove they are not messing around when it comes to shelling out big money for big-time exclusive content. Their latest purchase? The streaming service has secured the rights to director Orson Welles' final movie The Other Side of the Wind. The movie was never completed but Netflix is going to pay to complete the movie and have it restored so they can release it globally.

The New York Times is reporting that Netflix has completed a deal that they have been working on for a bit, and they now have secured the global rights for The Other Side of the Wind. The Citizen Kane director's project was being worked on in the 70s but due to financial issues, was never completed. The movie has pretty much shelved when Welles passed away in 1985. Producer and star Frank Marshall has tried to get the movie completed and he
See full article at MovieWeb »

Shield for Murder

Dirty cops were a movie vogue in 1954, and Edmond O'Brien scores as a real dastard in this overachieving United Artists thriller. Dreamboat starlet Marla English is the reason O'Brien's detective kills for cash, and then keeps killing to stay ahead of his colleagues. And all to buy a crummy house in the suburbs -- this man needs career counseling. Shield for Murder Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1954 / B&W / 1:75 widescreen / 82 min. / Street Date June 21, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Edmond O'Brien, Marla English, John Agar, Emile Meyer, Carolyn Jones, Claude Akins, Herbert Butterfield, Hugh Sanders, William Schallert, Robert Bray, Richard Deacon, David Hughes, Gregg Martell, Stafford Repp, Vito Scotti. Cinematography Gordon Avil Film Editor John F. Schreyer Original Music Paul Dunlap Written by Richard Alan Simmons, John C. Higgins from the novel by William P. McGivern <Produced by Aubrey Schenck, (Howard W. Koch) Directed by Edmond O'Brien, Howard W. Koch

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Here's the kind of '50s movie we love, an ambitious, modest crime picture that for its time had an edge. In the 1950s our country was as blind to the true extent of police corruption as it was to organized crime. Movies about bad cops adhered to the 'bad apple' concept: it's only crooked individuals that we need to watch out for, never the institutions around them. Thanks to films noir, crooked cops were no longer a film rarity, even though the Production Code made movies like The Asphalt Jungle insert compensatory scenes paying lip service to the status quo: an imperfect police force is better than none. United Artists in the 1950s helped star talent make the jump to independent production, with the prime success stories being Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. But the distribution company also funded proven producers capable of putting out smaller bread 'n' butter movies that could prosper if costs were kept down. Edward Small, Victor Saville, Levy-Gardner-Laven. Aubrey Schenck and Howard C. Koch produced as a team, and for 1954's Shield for Murder Koch co-directed, sharing credit with the film's star, Edmond O'Brien. The show is a smart production all the way, a modestly budgeted 'B' with 'A' ambitions. O'Brien was an industry go-getter trying to channel his considerable talent in new directions. His leading man days were fading but he was in demand for parts in major films like The Barefoot Contessa. The producers took care with their story too. Writers Richard Alan Simmons and John C. Higgins had solid crime movie credits. Author William P. McGivern wrote the novel behind Fritz Lang's The Big Heat as well as Rogue Cop and Odds Against Tomorrow. All of McGivern's stories involve crooked policemen or police corruption. Shield for Murder doesn't tiptoe around its subject matter. Dirty cop Detective Lt. Barney Nolan (O'Brien) kills a hoodlum in an alley to steal $25,000 of mob money. His precinct boss Captain Gunnarson (Emile Meyer) accepts Barney's version of events and the Asst. D.A. (William Schallert) takes the shooting as an open and shut case. Crime reporter Cabot (Herbert Butterfield) has his doubts, and lectures the squad room about the abuse of police power. Barney manages to placate mob boss Packy Reed (Hugh Sanders), but two hoods continue to shadow him. Barney's plan for the money was to buy a new house and escape the rat race with his girlfriend, nightclub cashier Patty Winters (Marla English). But a problem surfaces in the elderly deaf mute Ernst Sternmueller (David Hughes), a witness to the shooting. Barney realizes that his only way forward is to kill the old man before he can tell all to Det. Mark Brewster (John Agar), Barney's closest friend. Once again one of society's Good Guys takes a bite of the forbidden apple and tries to buck the system. Shield for Murder posits an logical but twisted course of action for a weary defender of the law who wants out. Barney long ago gave up trying to do anything about the crooks he can't touch. The fat cat Packy Reed makes the big money, and all Barney wants is his share. Barney's vision of The American Dream is just the middle-class ideal, the desirable Patty Winters and a modest tract home. He's picked it out - it sits partway up a hill in a new Los Angeles development, just finished and already furnished. Then the unexpected witness shows up and everything begins to unravel; Barney loses control one step at a time. He beats a mob thug (Claude Akins) half to death in front of witnesses. When his pal Mark Brewster figures out the truth, Barney has to use a lot of his money to arrange a getaway. More mob trouble leads to a shoot-out in a high school gym. The idea may have been for the star O'Brien to coach actors John Agar and Marla English to better performances. Agar is slightly more natural than usual, but still not very good. The gorgeous Ms. English remains sweet and inexpressive. After several unbilled bits, the woman often compared to Elizabeth Taylor was given "introducing" billing on the Shield for Murder billing block. Her best-known role would be as The She-Creature two years later, after which she dropped out to get married. Co-director O'Brien also allows Emile Meyer to go over the top in a scene or two. But the young Carolyn Jones is a standout as a blonde bargirl, more or less expanding on her small part as a human ashtray in the previous year's The Big Heat. Edmond O'Brien is occasionally a little to hyper, but he's excellent at showing stress as the trap closes around the overreaching Barney Nolan. Other United Artists budget crime pictures seem a little tight with the outdoors action -- Vice Squad, Witness to Murder, Without Warning -- but O'Brien and Koch's camera luxuriates in night shoots on the Los Angeles streets. This is one of those Blu-rays that Los Angelenos will want to freeze frame, to try to read the street signs. There is also little downtime wasted in sidebar plot detours. The gunfight in the school gym, next to an Olympic swimming pool, is an action highlight. The show has one enduring sequence. With the force closing in, Barney rushes back to the unfinished house he plans to buy, to recover the loot he's buried next to its foundation. Anybody who lived in Southern California in the '50s and '60s was aware of the massive suburban sprawl underway, a building boom that went on for decades. In 1953 the La Puente hills were so rural they barely served by roads; the movie The War of the Worlds considered it a good place to use a nuclear bomb against invading Martians. By 1975 the unending suburbs had spread from Los Angeles, almost all the way to Pomona. Barney dashes through a new housing development on terraced plots, boxy little houses separated from each other by only a few feet of dirt. There's no landscaping yet. Even in 1954 $25,000 wasn't that much money, so Barney Nolan has sold himself pretty cheaply. Two more latter-day crime pictures would end with ominous metaphors about the oblivion of The American Dream. In 1964's remake of The Killers the cash Lee Marvin kills for only buys him a patch of green lawn in a choice Hollywood Hills neighborhood. The L.A.P.D. puts Marvin out of his misery, and then closes in on another crooked detective in the aptly titled 1965 thriller The Money Trap. The final scene in that movie is priceless: his dreams smashed, crooked cop Glenn Ford sits by his designer swimming pool and waits to be arrested. Considering how well things worked out for Los Angeles police officers, Edmond O'Brien's Barney Nolan seems especially foolish. If Barney had stuck it out for a couple of years, the new deal for the L.A.P.D. would have been much better than a measly 25 grand. By 1958 he'd have his twenty years in. After a retirement beer bash he'd be out on the road pulling a shiny new boat to the Colorado River, like all the other hardworking cops and firemen enjoying their generous pensions. Policemen also had little trouble getting house loans. The joke was that an L.A.P.D. cop might go bad, but none of them could be bribed. O'Brien directed one more feature, took more TV work and settled into character parts for Jack Webb, Frank Tashlin, John Ford, John Frankenheimer and finally Sam Peckinpah in The Wild Bunch, where he was almost unrecognizable. Howard W. Koch slowed down as a director but became a busy producer, working with Frank Sinatra for several years. He eventually co-produced Airplane! The Kl Studio Classics Blu-ray of Shield for Murder is a good-looking B&W scan, framed at a confirmed-as-correct 1:75 aspect ratio. The picture is sharp and detailed, and the sound is in fine shape. The package art duplicates the film's original no-class sell: "Dame-Hungry Killer-Cop Runs Berserk! The first scene also contains one of the more frequently noticed camera flubs in film noir -- a really big boom shadow on a nighttime alley wall. Kino's presentation comes with trailers for this movie, Hidden Fear and He Ran All the Way. On a scale of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor, Shield for Murder Blu-ray rates: Movie: Good Video: Very Good Sound: Excellent Supplements: Trailers for Shield for Murder, Hidden Fear, He Ran All the Way Deaf and Hearing Impaired Friendly? N0; Subtitles: None Packaging: Keep case Reviewed: June 7, 2016 (5115murd)

Visit DVD Savant's Main Column Page Glenn Erickson answers most reader mail: dvdsavant@mindspring.com

Text © Copyright 2016 Glenn Erickson
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Nineteen Eighty-Four

Where do I get my Big Brother campaign pin and yard poster? Michael Radford's elaborate Orwell adaptation sticks closely to the original book, even after decades of deriviative dystopias have stolen its fire. John Hurt is excellent as Winston Smith, and Richard Burton is his inquisitor. Nineteen Eighty-Four Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1984 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Ship Date December 8, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring John Hurt, Richard Burton, Suzanna Hamilton, Cyril Cusack, Gregor Fisher, James Walker, Phyllis Logan. Cinematography Roger Deakins Production Designer Allan Cameron Art Direction Martin Hebert, Grant Hicks Film Editor Tom Priestley Original Music (2) Dominick Muldowney / Eurythmics Written by Jonathan Gems, Michael Radford from the novel by George Orwell Produced by Al Clark, Robert Devereux, Simon Perry, Marvin J. Rosenblum Directed by Michael Radford

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

George Orwell's pessimistic 1948 novel 1984 is probably the most important political book of the last century.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'Fantastic Voyage' Remake Targets Director Guillermo Del Toro

'Fantastic Voyage' Remake Targets Director Guillermo Del Toro
20th Century Fox's long-gestating Fantastic Voyage remake has been given new life, with Guillermo del Toro entering talks to develop and direct. The Hollywood Reporter reveals that the director will work with writers David S. Goyer and Justin Rhodes on the screenplay. The project is being eyed as a massive tentpole project for the studio, but an official release date has not yet been given.

James Cameron has been developing the project for several years now, and he will continue to produce with his Lightstorm Entertainment partners Jon Landau and Rae Sanchini, with David S. Goyer set to executive produce. We reported in May 2014 that David S. Goyer was writing a new treatment for the project, and now he is set to co-write the script with Justin Rhodes (Contract Killers).

The original Fantastic Voyage hit theaters in 1966, centering on a team of scientists who are shrunk to atomic size and
See full article at MovieWeb »

Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch"Screenings December 26-27, Museum Of The Moving Image

  • CinemaRetro
The Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, New York, will present  screenings of director Sam Peckinpah's 1969 classic "The Wild Bunch" on December 26-27. The film stars William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmond O'Brien, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates. (But you knew that already, didn't you?)

Note: Original plans to show the film in 70mm were cancelled because of the poor condition of the print. (Thanks to reader Nick Sheffo for the heads up.)

Click here for info. 
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

We still love John Ford's bitter-sentimental look back at the lost Myth of the West. John Wayne and James Stewart are at least thirty years too old for their roles, but everything seems to be happening in a foggy reverie, so what's the difference, Pilgrim?  Great comedy and Lee Marvin's marvelous villain, plus the assertive 'print the Legend' message that's been hotly debated ever since. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Blu-ray Warner Home Video / Paramount 1962 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 123 min. / Street Date October 13, 2015 / 14.98 Starring John Wayne, James Stewart, Vera Miles, Lee Marvin, Edmond O'Brien, Andy Devine, Ken Murray, John Carradine, Jeanette Nolan, John Qualen, Willis Bouchey, Carleton Young, Woody Strode, Denver Pyle, Strother Martin, Lee Van Cleef Cinematography William H. Clothier Production Designer Eddie Imazu & Hal Pereira Film Editor Otho Lovering Original Music Cyril J. Mockridge Writing credits James Warner Bellah & Willis Goldbeck from a story by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'The Killers' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

One story, three films, one Blu-ray disc. Excellent! Last night I finished my dive into the Criterion Collection's new Blu-ray release The Killers, which features two feature films and one short film, all adapted from the short story by Ernest Hemingway and all different in their own right and yet the same. From the noirish black-and-white of Robert Siodmak's 1946 original to Don Siegel's made-for-tv, 1964 adaptation shot in bright colors and telling the story from completely different perspective and yet, coming back to similar moral ground, or at least what may be referred to as "guy code" a la Hemingway. And don't forget Andrei Tarkovsky's 1956 short he made as a film student and you have one impressive package. If you're unfamiliar with Hemingway's short you can read it here, or, better yet, there's a reading of it by actor Stacy Keach included on this Blu-ray. Playing closest
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: 'Devil' Movie Questions Definition of Madness

'The Devil Strikes at Night,' with Mario Adorf as World War II era serial killer Bruno Lüdke 'The Devil Strikes at Night' movie review: Serial killing vs. mass murder in unsubtle but intriguing World War II political drama After more than a decade in Hollywood, German director Robert Siodmak (Academy Award nominated for the 1946 film noir The Killers) resumed his European career in the mid-1950s. In 1957, he directed The Devil Strikes at Night / Nachts, wenn der Teufel kam, an intriguing, well-crafted crime drama about the pursuit of a serial killer – and its political consequences – during the last months of the mass-murderous Nazi regime. Inspired by real events, The Devil Strikes at Night begins as war-scarred Hamburg is deeply shaken by the horrific murder of a waitress. Through the Homicide Bureau, inspector Axel Kersten (Claus Holm) begins an investigation that leads him to a mentally disabled laborer,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed