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UK box office preview: ‘Bombshell’ battles ‘Bad Boys For Life’

  • ScreenDaily
UK box office preview: ‘Bombshell’ battles ‘Bad Boys For Life’
Also opening: ‘Just Mercy’, ‘Waves’, ‘A Hidden Life’.

Awards contender Bombshell goes up against franchise reboot Bad Boys For Life at the UK box office this weekend.

Released through Lionsgate, Bombshell tells the true story of several women at Fox News who exposed former CEO Roger Ailes for multiple cases of sexual harassment in 2016.

The film stars Charlize Theron as Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly, with Nicole Kidman as fellow host Gretchen Carlson and Margot Robbie as a young producer at the network who is a composite of several people.

Directed by Jay Roach, Bombshell has garnered significant awards attention,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Movie Review – Waves (2019)

Waves, 2019. Directed by Trey Edward Shults. Starring Kelvin Harrison Jr., Lucas Hedges, Taylor Russell, Alexa Demie, Renée Elise Goldsberry, and Sterling K. Brown. Synopsis: A South Florida family deals with a loss in many different ways. Waves is a movie that reached into my chest, ripped my heart out, and handed it back to […]

The post Movie Review – Waves (2019) appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Waves review – high-school sports star wrestles with emotion | Peter Bradshaw's film of the week

Trey Edward Shults’ heartfelt redemption parable takes an unexpected route through the story of a teenager’s struggles at home and in class

After disturbing us all with survivalist thriller It Comes at Night in 2017, Texan film-maker Trey Edward Shults – still just 31 – steps up his already impressive game with this vehemently acted and formally audacious drama about an African American family in Miami. It is a parable of redemption, and about a kind of spiritual or metaphysical resonance between the unhappy lives of two siblings.

At film festivals worldwide, Waves has already been much praised for an experimental, anti-narrative approach and a supposed privileging of vignettes, scenes and moods over regular storytelling. Actually, this is misleading. The movie is perfectly legible in conventional linear terms. But where it goes, how it gets there and how it comes back again, is more unexpected. There is a wonderful score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

How Waves unpicks the pressures of ‘black excellence’

Newcomers Kevin Harrison Jr and Taylor Russell on writer-director Trey Edward Shults’s drama about the aftermath of a family tragedy

When Kelvin Harrison Jr, 25, was working on his lead role in Waves, his manager asked him if he wanted to pull out. “There was a fear,” he says, about whether he and the film’s writer-director Trey Edward Shults could pull off its ferocious, narrative-shifting central event.

That tour-de-force moment, which we can’t get into without breaking the law of spoilers, would alter the direction of the film entirely, abruptly switching its lead from Harrison to fellow newcomer Taylor Russell, and transforming a joyful tale of young romance into a bruising one of violence and its consequences. If Waves is a film of two halves, then this jaw-dropping scene, lasting just a few minutes, is its crucial pivot. “Even A24 was scared!” says Harrison. “But I was like: ‘No!
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

2020 Oscar Predictions: Best Original Screenplay (Updated: January 12)

2020 Oscar Predictions: Best Original Screenplay (Updated: January 12)
Since the academy expanded the Best Picture category at the Oscars in 2010, Best Original Screenplay has gone to writers of a wide-range of genres: dramas; comedies (“Midnight in Paris”); biopics; true-life stories (“Spotlight”); period pictures (“Django Unchained”); war movies (“The Hurt Locker”); sci-fi (“Her”) and horror (“Get Out”). (Scroll down for the most up-to-date 2020 Oscars predictions for Best Original Screenplay and be sure to check out our predictions for Best Adapted Screenplay.)

Regardless of the type of film, a nominee needs broad academy support to win this race. Indeed, all 10 of these most recent Best Original Screenplay winners were, at the least, Best Picture nominees. And five of them won the big prize, bringing the total number of Best Picture champs with Oscar-winning original screenplays to 17. By comparison, 41 films have done this on the adapted side.

In 2019, four of the five nominees for Best Original Screenplay at the Academy Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Demitra Kampakis’ Top 10 Films of 2019

Following our top 50 films of 2019, we’re sharing personal top 10 lists from our contributors. Check out the latest below and see our complete year-end coverage here.

What a way to bid the decade adieu! 2019 boasted an incredible lineup of foreign, art-house and independent films—ranging from character studies to multi-genre fare to ghost stories and socially charged thrillers—and in many ways, this year’s offerings were the perfect distillation and culmination of ten years’ worth of technical, cultural, political and artistic transformations. The growing embrace of large format lenses (Midsommar) and de-aging technology (The Irishman), and bolder experimentations with frame rate, storytelling, structure (Climax) and guerilla filmmaking techniques or Diy methods of production (every Safdie brothers film including Uncut Gems) are but some of these changes, while the proliferation of streaming sites from the popular to the curated breathed new life into overlooked films by allowing smaller-scale titles, inaccessible
See full article at The Film Stage »

Writers Guild Awards Nominations Boost Comedies ‘Booksmart’ and ‘Knives Out’

Writers Guild Awards Nominations Boost Comedies ‘Booksmart’ and ‘Knives Out’
Writers Guild of America West and Writers Guild of America, East have announced nominations for outstanding achievement in screenwriting during 2019. Following up two big Golden Globes wins, rising awards contender “1917” landed an Original Screenplay nomination for Sam Mendes and Krysty Wilson-Cairns, along with nods for comedies “Knives Out,” “Booksmart,” and Globes-winner “Parasite,” as well as Noah Baumbach’s drama “Marriage Story.”

Baumbach’s partner, writer-director Greta Gerwig, landed a nomination for Adapted Screenplay for “Little Women.” Shockingly omitted was Anthony McCarten’s script for Netflix’s “The Two Popes,” which may turn up on Oscar nominations morning in the less competitive Adapted category; the WGA considered it as Original because McCarten’s play on which it was based had not been produced when the script was written.

And documentarian Alex Gibney scored not one but two nominations, for “Citizen K” as well as “The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Writers Guild Awards Nominations Boost Comedies ‘Booksmart’ and ‘Knives Out’

Writers Guild Awards Nominations Boost Comedies ‘Booksmart’ and ‘Knives Out’
Writers Guild of America West and Writers Guild of America, East have announced nominations for outstanding achievement in screenwriting during 2019. Following up two big Golden Globes wins, rising awards contender “1917” landed an Original Screenplay nomination for Sam Mendes and Krysty Wilson-Cairns, along with nods for comedies “Knives Out,” “Booksmart,” and Globes-winner “Parasite,” as well as Noah Baumbach’s drama “Marriage Story.”

Baumbach’s partner, writer-director Greta Gerwig, landed a nomination for Adapted Screenplay for “Little Women.” Shockingly omitted was Anthony McCarten’s script for Netflix’s “The Two Popes,” which may turn up on Oscar nominations morning in the less competitive Adapted category; the WGA considered it as Original because McCarten’s play on which it was based had not been produced when the script was written.

And documentarian Alex Gibney scored not one but two nominations, for “Citizen K” as well as “The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Waves’ Dp Drew Daniels Discusses the Striking Look of the Drama

  • Variety
‘Waves’ Dp Drew Daniels Discusses the Striking Look of the Drama
Waves,” the latest collaboration between cinematographer Drew Daniels and writer-director Trey Edward Shults, is an emotional drama centered on an upper-middle class African-American family in Florida. Daniels’ camera work highlights the characters’ stories while celebrating the film’s setting.

When you first saw the script, what jumped out as things you could highlight or play with to help both propel the story and convey the South Florida setting?

It was immediately the most heartbreaking and dynamic script I’ve ever read. Music was embedded in the script … the music itself had this sort of rhythm to it. Since Trey and I have worked together for so long, I could sense the emotion and knew what he wanted; we like to have our films evolve and change, and the cinematic language changes throughout this film with the characters’ emotions and as the story arc changes. We built this really detailed camera
See full article at Variety »

'Maybe I'm taking things too far': Trey Edwards Shults on mining his family's trauma

His first three films have depicted families in crisis – and led to comparisons with Darren Aronofsky. Just don’t ask him to direct a superhero movie

In 2013, the director Trey Edward Shults got a call from a hospital in Missouri; his father was dying of pancreatic cancer. They hadn’t spoken in a decade. His dad was an alcoholic and addict with a history of domestic violence. “I didn’t want to go,” he says. “My dad wasn’t a part of my life. So you care, but you don’t, if you know what I mean? You compartmentalise.”

In the end, his girlfriend persuaded him to drive to Missouri. Shults comforted his regret-filled father as best he could. Two months later, he wrote his second film, the low-fi apocalyptic horror It Comes at Night. In three days he had finished the script, featuring a deathbed scene with the same
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Christopher Schobert’s Top 10 Films of 2019

Following our top 50 films of 2019, we’re sharing personal top 10 lists from our contributors. Check out the latest below and see our complete year-end coverage here.

Anyone who claims 2019 was a poor year for movies, well, didn’t see what I saw. I found it to be a year with a stunning collection of greats. Consider: My list of fifteen favorites somehow left off the likes of High Life, Transit, The Farewell, The Last Black Man in San Francisco, Booksmart, Hustlers, and A Hidden Life. And the No. 1 slot on my list could just have easily been taken by any other entry in my top seven. My own cinema highlight was seeing The Irishman on a rainy October morning at the BFI London Film Festival. Leaning back in my seat at the Odeon Luxe Leicester Square, I felt a surge of excitement that was positively dizzying. At its best, that
See full article at The Film Stage »

With ‘Waves,’ Director Trey Edward Shults Strives To Honor Beautiful Complexity Of “Flesh-And-Blood Human Beings”

  • Deadline
With ‘Waves,’ Director Trey Edward Shults Strives To Honor Beautiful Complexity Of “Flesh-And-Blood Human Beings”
Following a frustrating experience with 2017’s It Comes At Night, writer/director Trey Edward Shults found a “therapeutic and cathartic” experience in mounting his third feature, Waves.

Feeling the pressure that comes when one’s work is falsely framed, or misunderstood, Shults channeled it into Waves protagonist Tyler (Kelvin Harrison Jr.), a young wrestler in South Florida who becomes unglued following an injury, soon grappling with the consequences of a tragedy he never saw coming. A diptych that switches, midway through, to the perspective of Tyler’s younger sister Emily (Taylor Russell), the film ultimately examines the way in which a suburban family comes together, in the aftermath of loss.

“It was healing to channel those emotions into a new thing, and then just try to make something that was all of me, as a human being, with human beings I love so much,” Shults tells Deadline. “Honestly, making Waves
See full article at Deadline »

Why the Writers Guild Awards Never Nominate Quentin Tarantino

Why the Writers Guild Awards Never Nominate Quentin Tarantino
One way the Writers Guild of America leverages clout is by withholding non-signatories from being part of the WGA Awards. That’s why unlike other guilds, a clump of indie, British, and animated movies find themselves excluded every year. A WGA nomination isn’t essential for Oscar nomination; exceptions include American indie “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” Iranian Oscar-winner “A Separation,” Oscar-winning British films “Les Miserables” and “The Favourite,” and all Pixar animated contenders, from “Up” to “Incredibles 2.” “The Artist” and “The King’s Speech” both won Best Picture without the benefit of a WGA nomination.

One person who never appears on those ballots: Quentin Tarantino. After the WGA granted the young screenwriter only a story credit on Oliver Stone’s “Natural Born Killers,” Tarantino refused to join the guild. And so he’s not among the 64 original and 44 adapted screenplays on the WGA ballots that members began receiving this week.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why the Writers Guild Awards Never Nominate Quentin Tarantino

  • Indiewire
Why the Writers Guild Awards Never Nominate Quentin Tarantino
One way the Writers Guild of America leverages clout is by withholding non-signatories from being part of the WGA Awards. That’s why unlike other guilds, a clump of indie, British, and animated movies find themselves excluded every year. A WGA nomination isn’t essential for Oscar nomination; exceptions include American indie “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” Iranian Oscar-winner “A Separation,” Oscar-winning British films “Les Miserables” and “The Favourite,” and all Pixar animated contenders, from “Up” to “Incredibles 2.” “The Artist” and “The King’s Speech” both won Best Picture without the benefit of a WGA nomination.

One person who never appears on those ballots: Quentin Tarantino. After the WGA granted the young screenwriter only a story credit on Oliver Stone’s “Natural Born Killers,” Tarantino refused to join the guild. And so he’s not among the 64 original and 44 adapted screenplays on the WGA ballots that members began receiving this week.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Once Upon a Time,’ ‘Farewell,’ ‘Judy’ Excluded From Writers Guild Awards

  • Variety
‘Once Upon a Time,’ ‘Farewell,’ ‘Judy’ Excluded From Writers Guild Awards
The scripts for Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Lulu Wang’s “The Farewell” and Tom Edge’s “Judy” have been excluded from the Writers Guild of America Awards.

Unlike other guilds, the WGA excludes as candidates any screenplays not produced under its jurisdiction or that of another guild. That’s because the WGA has the ultimate authority over determining which writers receive screenplay credit, if the script is produced under WGA jurisdiction.

WGA leaders have said that if the script is not produced under a guild contract, there’s no certainty as to authorship.

Other original scripts that have been excluded from voting are: Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory”; “The Peanut Butter Falcon” from writers Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz; “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” by Jimmie Fails, Rob Richert and Joe Talbot; Trey Edward Shults’ “Waves” and “Midsommar” by Ari Aster.

Adapted
See full article at Variety »

WGA Awards’ Preliminary Ballot Nixes Tarantino & Almodóvar Films, ‘The Farewell’ And More; ‘Two Popes’, ‘Hustlers’ Moved To Original Screenplay

  • Deadline
WGA Awards’ Preliminary Ballot Nixes Tarantino & Almodóvar Films, ‘The Farewell’ And More; ‘Two Popes’, ‘Hustlers’ Moved To Original Screenplay
Exclusive: Heavyweight Oscar contenders Quentin Tarantino and Pedro Almodóvar are among those who will not be going to the WGA Awards this year. And get your knives out, FilmTwitter, because one of the high-profile female directors ignored by the Golden Globes’ directing category, Lulu Wang for The Farewell, won’t have her screenplay invited either. And not so fast, Netflix: The WGA has a different idea of what The Two Popes is than you do.

The WGA sent members (I am one) the 2020 preliminary screenplay ballot this week. A total of 64 original scripts and 44 adapted screenplays are on it, meaning members can pick their five nominees in both categories only from the names on this list.

The Writers Guild, whose awards are a key stop during the season, operates its annual kudos show in a different way than others (including the DGA and SAG) by excluding from consideration any
See full article at Deadline »

Rushes: Anti-List Manifesto, Whit Stillman, The Music of Kelly Reichardt's Films

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSLav Diaz's When the Waves Are Gone.Lav Diaz has reportedly begun production on his latest, When the Waves Are Gone. According to Epicmedia, the film is a "re-intepretation of The Count of Monte Cristo [that] revolves around a prisoner freed after thirty years, embarking on a bloody trail of revenge against his best friend to reclaim all that he has lost."Recommended VIEWINGThe official trailer for Karim Aïnouz's Invisible Life, which follows a pair of sisters separated by love, art, and family. Read our review of the film here.Recommended READINGSally Potter's Orlando.In response to BBC's recent poll of the "100 greatest films directed by women," Notebook contributor Willow Maclay delves into why and how such a survey—which omits films like Barbara Hammer's Dyketactics and Sally Potter's Orlando—points to
See full article at MUBI »

Waves – Review

(L-r) Kelvin Harrison Jr., Taylor Russell, Sterling K. Brown, Renée Elise Goldsberry in Waves. Courtesy of A24

One might call Waves a family drama but that fails to capture the emotional tsunami that this outstanding film truly is.

The story is set in South Florida but the title has little to do with the shoreline. Instead, the waves are more the emotional kind, ebbing and flowing through the tides of life, sometimes gentle and soothing, sometimes rough and buffeting, and at times threatening to overwhelm and knock us off our feet.

Writer/director Trey Edward Shults uses a dynamic, kinetic camera and a pounding score to place us right in the emotional heart of this story of an upper middle-class African American family in South Florida. From the outside, the family looks perfect with everything going for them – two happily married successful parents, two teenage children, the oldest of which,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Best Films of 2019

  • Variety
Looking back, 2019 was a year in which Netflix followed up the history-making performance of “Roma” at the Oscars with the release of Martin Scorsese’s mega-budget “The Irishman,” when Marvel’s “Avengers: Endgame” broke box office records while DC’s divisive “Joker” spin-off ignited a firestorm of debate, and where rival streaming services Disney Plus and Apple TV Plus further challenged our fundamental concept of what constitutes a motion picture.

Such definitions may be in flux, but the offerings themselves — from studio blockbusters to intimate independents to straight-to-streaming novelties — give film critics and moviegoers alike reason to be optimistic. While Scorsese and Marvel honcho Kevin Feige quite publicly disagreed about what defines a cinematic experience, audiences have more avenues than ever to experience cinema.

Variety reviewed nearly 1,000 new releases this year, from which chief critics Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman picked their favorites among the films that opened in U.
See full article at Variety »

Filmmakers Talk Building Families for Awards Contenders Like ‘Parasite,’ ‘Marriage Story’

  • Variety
Filmmakers Talk Building Families for Awards Contenders Like ‘Parasite,’ ‘Marriage Story’
Many of the most memorable movie families don’t rely on looking alike. Intimate family dramas are testaments to the power of great acting, where sensitivity, emotional perceptiveness and imitation create a bond that resembles the real thing. The directors behind some of 2019’s most acclaimed ensemble-driven films used several strategies to create believable family ties.

Bong Joon Ho, whose “Parasite” depicts an unusual symbiotic relationship between a wealthy family and a poor family in contemporary Seoul, says he often works with photos during the casting process. “Because cinema is a visual medium, I thought that the families should give off a family-like air from first glance,” Bong says.

Bong takes photos of possible actors himself, and also tries arranging existing photos into various formations to create two families of four.

“When we look at family photos in real life, we inexplicably get the sense that they truly are one family,
See full article at Variety »
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