Indie News

‘Cyrano, My Love’: Is A Delightful Look At The Creation Of A Classic [Review]

‘Cyrano, My Love’: Is A Delightful Look At The Creation Of A Classic [Review]
When “Cyrano De Bergerac” first appeared on the stage in Paris, it seemed like a gift from God in an era of canting comedies. Who could have guessed that this failed playwright could write an overnight success literally overnight? No one, apparently. In 19th century Paris, people mocked Edmond Rostand for performing poetry. “Write a comedy!” they told him. And so he did. The journey that follows his path to writing high-brow humor, “Cyrano, My Love,” seems like a gift from God in an era of standard-issue biopics.

Continue reading ‘Cyrano, My Love’: Is A Delightful Look At The Creation Of A Classic [Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Bloodshot’ Trailer: Vin Diesel Becomes A Superhuman Killer In Sony’s & Valiant Comics First Superhero Feature

You hear Vin Diesel (“Fast & Furious” series) and the words “killing machine,” you don’t bat an eyelid. Diesel and the action genre go hand in hand really, well here he goes again in another similar role as he plays Valiant Comics own “Bloodshot” in there feature film debut.

The project is being directed by Dave Wilson, and will serve as his first feature film as a director.

Continue reading ‘Bloodshot’ Trailer: Vin Diesel Becomes A Superhuman Killer In Sony’s & Valiant Comics First Superhero Feature at The Playlist.
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The Oscar-Predictive Cameraimage Festival Lineup Will Include ‘Joker’ and ‘The Irishman’

The Oscar-Predictive Cameraimage Festival Lineup Will Include ‘Joker’ and ‘The Irishman’
The Toruń, Poland film festival dedicated to the art of cinematography has become homecoming week for directors of photography from around the globe. And while Camerimage organizers say they have no interest in the American awards season, cinematographers nominate cinematographers for the Oscars — and the 13 films that compete for the Golden Frog for Best Cinematography have become a predictor of the Academy’s Best Cinematography nominees.

The Camerimage 2019 Main Competition includes: “Ford v Ferrari” (Dp Phedon Papamichael), “The Irishman” (Dp Rodrigo Prieto), “Joker” (Dp Lawrence Sher), “The Last Black Man in San Francisco” (Dp Adam Newport-Berra), “Motherless Brooklyn” (Dp Dick Pope), “The Two Popes” (Dp César Charlone), “The Painted Bird” (Dp Vladimír Smutný), “An Officer and a Spy” (Dp Paweł Edelman), “Never Look Away” (Dp Caleb Deschanel), “Mr. Jones” (Dp Tomasz Naumiuk), “Shadow” (Dp Xiaoding Zhao), “Bolden” (Dp Neal Norton), and “Amundsen” (Dp Paal Ulvik Rokseth).

IndieWire has confirmed that
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Kirsten Dunst and ‘On Becoming a God in Central Florida’ Director Break Down Finale’s Most Poignant Scene

  • Indiewire
Kirsten Dunst and ‘On Becoming a God in Central Florida’ Director Break Down Finale’s Most Poignant Scene
[Editor’s Note: This story contains spoilers for the season finale of “On Becoming a God in Central Florida,” titled “Go Getters Gonna Go Getcha.”]

The hands down best scene of Showtime’s exceptionally good, wild ride of a series “On Becoming a God in Central Florida” arrives at the season’s end. As it turns out, it was also the last scene that director Charlie McDowell shot with stars Kirsten Dunst and Théodore Pellerin.

In the Sunday night finale, Krystal (Dunst) — the streetwise Orlando water-park employee who takes command of the cult-like pyramid scheme that drove her husband to his death — is, as she puts it, “fucking done.” By now, Krystal has confronted the insidious, true nature of Fam, which hasn’t been paying off for her or for her co-conspirator Cody (Pellerin), who’s been working as a security detail for the Garbeaus.

In the climactic scene of “Go Getters Gonna Go Getcha,” Krystal and Cody share a come-to-Jesus moment in an empty bathtub,
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‘Watchmen’ Review: Decoding Damon Lindelof’s Masterful Premiere, Including That Shocking Final Shot

‘Watchmen’ Review: Decoding Damon Lindelof’s Masterful Premiere, Including That Shocking Final Shot
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Watchmen” Episode 1, “It’s Summer, and We’re Running Out of Ice.]

Like a herd of cattle stampeding through a Tulsa ranch, the “Watchmen” premiere comes at you fast. Easily Damon Lindelof’s most tightly packed episode since “The Leftovers” Season 3 debut, “The Book of Kevin,” “It’s Summer, and We’re Running Out of Ice” builds a vivid new world on the foundation laid by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ graphic novel — and then it digs a new basement to boot. By opening with the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, Lindelof establishes a new (and true) starting point for his story, as well as a stark framing that sets the stage for the series’ central conflict: the white supremacists in the Seventh Kavalry and a police force led by a black detective, Angela Abar (Regina King).

In between, there are easter eggs galore for fans of the original comic book, more
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‘The Walking Dead’ Review: ‘Ghosts’ Kicks Season 10 Down A Notch

‘The Walking Dead’ Review: ‘Ghosts’ Kicks Season 10 Down A Notch
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “The Walking Dead” Season 10, Episode 3, “Ghosts.”]

If you were hoping “The Walking Dead” would start revving the old storytelling engines after the table setting of this season’s first two episodes, I’m afraid you’ll have to keep waiting. There is some incremental progress made in the Whisperer storyline during “Ghosts”, but otherwise it’s a bunch of uninspired or redundant character work. No one would ever accuse “The Walking Dead” of being a fast-paced series, but I held some hope that after Season 9’s eventful run, Season 10 would shake things up a bit more. But if this year’s first three episodes are any indication, Season 9’s pacing was an aberration; we’re back to slowed-down business as usual. And sadly, “Ghosts” is the weakest episode of Season 10 so far.

Man Is the True Monster

The main story this week concerns Carol, who responds to seeing Alpha again
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‘Maleficent’ Is Less Than Magnificent as Annual Box Office Performance Continues to Slide

  • Indiewire
‘Maleficent’ Is Less Than Magnificent as Annual Box Office Performance Continues to Slide
While specialty titles spent this weekend breaking records, overall performance showed that the season’s weakness continues. The clearest sign comes from the disappointing start for “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil;” following “Gemini Man,” it’s the second very expensive domestic disappointment in as many weeks. Another sequel, “Zombieland; Double Tap” had a decent start, although as expected it was bested by the third weekend of “Joker.”

All told, it’s another weekend below the same period in 2018. With an estimated total of around $136 million, that’s 20% lower than last year, when “Halloween” opened to more than “Maleficent” and “Zombieland” combined. It also extends the annual shortfall to nearly $550 million and almost 6%, eliminating any real hope of box-office growth.

Disney dominance is propelled by an assembly line that includes its live-action versions of animated and other kids classics. However, this sequel to “Maleficent” opened to less than half of the 2014 original; at a $200 million production cost,
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James Gunn Takes on Coppola and Scorsese: You’re Geniuses, But You Don’t Get Marvel

  • Indiewire
James Gunn Takes on Coppola and Scorsese: You’re Geniuses, But You Don’t Get Marvel
It never ends. The anti-Marvel Cinematic Universe screeds from major auteurs continues to unravel, with Francis Ford Coppola recently responding to Martin Scorsese’s response to McU films and their ilk, which “The Irishman” director labeled as “not cinema.” And now, “Guardians of the Galaxy” writer/director James Gunn, who’s currently filming Warner BrothersDC entry “The Suicide Squad” because apparently one of those movies wasn’t enough, has added tinder to the flames of the ongoing debate.

Gunn, who’s weathered his lion’s share of social media controversies over the years, including offensive tweets that led to him being fired by Disney, sounded off on Instagram Sunday afternoon in a lengthy post, embedded below.

“Many of our grandfathers thought all gangster movies were the same, often calling them ‘despicable,'” he wrote. “Some of our great grandfathers thought the same of westerns, and believed the films of John Ford,
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John Lithgow on Suiting Up to Play Roger Ailes in ‘Bombshell’: ‘We Decided He Really Needed Man Boobs’

  • Indiewire
John Lithgow on Suiting Up to Play Roger Ailes in ‘Bombshell’: ‘We Decided He Really Needed Man Boobs’
Jay Roach’s late-breaking awards-season hopeful “Bombshell” (December 20) boasts several feats of makeup and wardrobe mastery, from Charlize Theron’s Megyn Kelly to John Lithgow’s disgraced, late Fox News CEO Roger Ailes — jowls, bulbous nose, corpulence and all. During a recent Q&a for the film in New York moderated by journalist Lynn Hirschberg, Lithgow was joined by co-stars Theron and Nicole Kidman, who plays TV news personality Gretchen Carlson, as well as director Roach and screenwriter Charles Randolph, to discuss the making of the film.

The makeup team is led by Kazuhiro Tsuji, who won an Academy Award in 2018 for transforming Gary Oldman into Winston Churchill and also turned Eddie Murphy into “Norbit” in 2007. Lithgow himself played Winston Churchill on Netflix’s “The Crown,” but without any makeup, hairstyling, or wardrobe needed to abet his transformation.

“This is the greatest irony, that [Kazu] made Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill
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“If You Have Racist Beliefs, They Want You to Say So at Dinner”: Yaara Sumeruk on Her Doc Short, If We Say That We Are Friends

Making its world premiere at the recently concluded Camden International Film Festival was New York-based, Argentinian/South African director Yaara Sumeruk’s short doc, If We Say That We Are Friends, which, in a taut 17 minutes, sits the viewer down into the midst of a warmly unusual conversation on race taking place across dinner tables in the Cape Town South African township Khayelitsha. The organizers of Dine with Khayelitsha arrange for relatively well-off South Afrikaners from the city to hear first-hand about life in the townships by joining residents for dinners of African food in their homes. (Formed in 2015, the […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“If You Have Racist Beliefs, They Want You to Say So at Dinner”: Yaara Sumeruk on Her Doc Short, If We Say That We Are Friends

Making its world premiere at the recently concluded Camden International Film Festival was New York-based, Argentinian/South African director Yaara Sumeruk’s short doc, If We Say That We Are Friends, which, in a taut 17 minutes, sits the viewer down into the midst of a warmly unusual conversation on race taking place across dinner tables in the Cape Town South African township Khayelitsha. The organizers of Dine with Khayelitsha arrange for relatively well-off South Afrikaners from the city to hear first-hand about life in the townships by joining residents for dinners of African food in their homes. (Formed in 2015, the […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Emilia Clarke on ‘Game of Thrones’ Finale Backlash: ‘We Would Never Have Made Everyone Happy’

  • Indiewire
Emilia Clarke on ‘Game of Thrones’ Finale Backlash: ‘We Would Never Have Made Everyone Happy’
The bad taste that the “Game of Thrones” finale left back in May continues to linger — to the point where even George R.R. Martin has sought to shake it off. In a recent conversation with The Daily Telegraph, Emilia Clarke, who played Daenerys Targaryen on the HBO series, talked about life after Westeros and that final episode that has ticked so many viewers off.

“I was too busy focusing on my own reactions to really pay too much attention, if any at all,” she said. “The only thing I felt truthfully sad about was that [executive producers] David [Benioff] and Dan [Weiss] are my really good friends, and so it’s for them that I feel heartbreak, because it’s theirs.”

Clarke, who stars in Paul Feig’s upcoming holiday-themed film “Last Christmas” opposite “Crazy Rich Asians” and “A Simple Favor” heartthrob Henry Golding, added, “Everyone is going to have their own opinion and
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‘Jojo Rabbit’ and ‘The Lighthouse’ Lead an Unprecedented Specialized Box Office Bounty

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‘Jojo Rabbit’ and ‘The Lighthouse’ Lead an Unprecedented Specialized Box Office Bounty
Never in the recent specialized film era has a non-holiday weekend achieved such exciting box office. Arriving after last weekend’s sensational record-breaking opening of Neon’s “Parasite” (which expanded well) are strong debuts for both Taika Waititi’s “Jojo Rabbit” (Fox Searchlight) and Robert Eggers’ “The Lighthouse” (A24). And top awards contenders “Pain and Glory” (Sony Pictures Classics) and “Judy” (Roadside Attractions) continue steady as they go.

In the same crowded four week period in 2018, only “Free Solo” went on to specialized success. Why are things so much better this year? The films themselves are a factor, but the earliest awards calendar season ever has forced smart distributors to recalibrate. Getting started now allows for gradual growth heading toward maximum attention over the Thanksgiving holiday. Also, opening early allows the option of home-viewing availabilities around the time of the Oscar nominations.

Whatever the reasons, it is working. After a
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“It Was a Story that Played Out Almost as a Psychological Thriller and Yet it was True”: Ed Perkins on Tell Me Who I Am

Tell Me Who I Am, the Telluride-premiering feature from Academy Award-nominated (for Best Documentary Short Subject) director Ed Perkins, digs into the stranger-than-fiction saga of Alex Lewis, one half of an identical set of twins, who at the age of 18 lost his memory in a motorcycle accident. Upon awakening from a coma the only person Alex was able to recognize was his brother Marcus — the mirror image he would come to rely on to relearn pretty much everything, from the mundane (down to brushing his teeth) to his very sense of self. In turn, Marcus devotes himself wholeheartedly […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“It Was a Story that Played Out Almost as a Psychological Thriller and Yet it was True”: Ed Perkins on Tell Me Who I Am

Tell Me Who I Am, the Telluride-premiering feature from Academy Award-nominated (for Best Documentary Short Subject) director Ed Perkins, digs into the stranger-than-fiction saga of Alex Lewis, one half of an identical set of twins, who at the age of 18 lost his memory in a motorcycle accident. Upon awakening from a coma the only person Alex was able to recognize was his brother Marcus — the mirror image he would come to rely on to relearn pretty much everything, from the mundane (down to brushing his teeth) to his very sense of self. In turn, Marcus devotes himself wholeheartedly […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

‘Tremors’ Trailer: Jayro Bustamante Returns With Drama Centered on Gay Man Caught Between Faith and Family

  • Indiewire
‘Tremors’ Trailer: Jayro Bustamante Returns With Drama Centered on Gay Man Caught Between Faith and Family
Guatemalan writer-director Jayro Bustamante broke out with the 2015 drama “Ixcanul,” set on an active volcano. Here he returns with “Tremors” (the English translation of “Temblores”), equally volcanic in its emotional insight about an affluent, religious family torn asunder after patriarch Pablo (Juan Pablo Olyslager) reveals that he’s been in a relationship with another man. Below, check out the first trailer.

Here’s the rest of the synopsis of the film, which is being distributed by Film Movement in the U.S. on November 29:

“What follows is a tale of passionate romance, immense inner conflict, and devastating tragedy. Separated from his wife, his children, and his life of Evangelical tradition, Pablo initially finds a sense of freedom. But how long can he sustain this new and exciting life when he’s fired from his job and his religious creed begins to take over again? Filled with gorgeous and breathtaking cinematography,
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Francis Ford Coppola Enters The Marvel Debate & Calls The Superhero Franchise “Despicable”

As we enter the 19th month of the pleasant “Is Marvel cinema or not?” conversation—some may call a “debate”— tensions are not high at all, and this is easily one of the most congenial dialogues in some time about whether or not superhero movies that play in the cinema, are indeed cinema, or perhaps some other new breed of product we’ve not yet established.

Read More: Samuel L. Jackson Responds to Martin Scorsese’s Superhero Comments

The argument started with none other than Martin Scorsese, who compared Marvel Studios franchise movies to an invasive species that was ruining film culture.

Continue reading Francis Ford Coppola Enters The Marvel Debate & Calls The Superhero Franchise “Despicable” at The Playlist.
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‘Jojo Rabbit’ and Nazi Satire: Why It’s So Hard to Mock the Bad Guys, and How to Get It Right

‘Jojo Rabbit’ and Nazi Satire: Why It’s So Hard to Mock the Bad Guys, and How to Get It Right
It’s impossible to address the challenge of Nazi satire without considering “The Day the Clown Cried.” Jerry Lewis’ misbegotten 1972 production found the comedian directing himself as a Jewish entertainer at a concentration camp. To date, the completed work (if it exists at all) has never been seen. Lewis was reportedly ashamed of the project and managed to hide the footage from the world for the remainder of his life. “Jojo Rabbit” is some indication of why Lewis wanted to bury it: It’s no easy task to turn the Holocaust into a punchline.

There’s a difference between confronting evil and actually dismantling its assumptions. For all the good intentions of “Jojo Rabbit,” Taika Waititi’s “anti-hate satire” never contends with the Nazism at its core. It would be a different story if the movie, in the grand subversive tradition of “The Producers,” appropriated Nazi iconography by positioning it
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Francis Ford Coppola Says Marvel Movies Are ‘Despicable’

  • Indiewire
Another day, another disgruntled auteur shitting all over the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The latest to join the cinematic fray of esteemed directors who have nothing good to say about the McU is Francis Ford Coppola, who admittedly supports Martin Scorsese’s recent comments condemning the superhero franchise to death.

“When Martin Scorsese says that the Marvel pictures are not cinema, he’s right because we expect to learn something from cinema, we expect to gain something, some enlightenment, some knowledge, some inspiration…I don’t know that anyone gets anything out of seeing the same movie over and over again,” the 80-year-old filmmaker said, according to Yahoo! News. “Martin was kind when he said it’s not cinema. He didn’t say it’s despicable, which I just say it is.”

Coppola spoke while on hand to receive a lifetime achievement award at the just-concluding Lumière Festival in Lyon, France.
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Review: The Light is Mine—Robert Eggers’ "The Lighthouse"

  • MUBI
It’s the 1890s. The world is a sea of mist, and a boat punches through it, foghorns blasting and engine chugging. Were it not for the waves breaking under the bow you couldn’t quite tell where the ocean ends and the sky begins: it hangs like some cerebral and color-scrubbed obstacle in a rainy haze. Robert EggersThe Lighthouse opens with this oneiric, perturbing vision, and hangs in that same nebulous universe all throughout, straddling dreams and nightmares. A follow-up to his fulminating 2015 folk horror debut The Witch, this is an entrancing and feverish descent into hell, peppered with a dark, alcohol-fueled, wry comic edge. Aboard the steamboat are Willem Dafoe’s Thomas Wake and Robert Pattinson’s Ephraim Winslow. Wake is spirited-eyed, spiky-haired and rotten-toothed ex-sailor with a penchant for liquor, flatulence, and sea-dog stories. Winslow is his right hand—a bookish, taciturn, and cash-strapped former logger
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