Penny Serenade (1941) - News Poster

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Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘His Girl Friday,’ ‘North by Northwest,’ ‘Penny Serenade’

Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘His Girl Friday,’ ‘North by Northwest,’ ‘Penny Serenade’
He was born Archibald Alec Leach in South West England on January 18, 1904. As a teen, he became attracted to show biz at an early age, becoming friends with a troupe of acrobats and doing odd jobs while hanging out backstage at theaters. At 16, he would travel by ship to the United States, where he would eventually change his name to Cary Grant after signing his first movie contract in 1931. He became one of the most admired and beloved leading men that Hollywood would ever produce.

SEEAlfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Grant’s suave looks and elegant voice served him well when he started acting in films, but his artistry and nuance on screen matured considerably over the years. He would work with the master Alfred Hitchcock several times, including “North by Northwest,” “Notorious” and “To Catch a Thief.” Grant was also quite deft with comedy roles,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Cary Grant movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
He was born Archibald Alec Leach in South West England on January 18, 1904. As a teen, he became attracted to show biz at an early age, becoming friends with a troupe of acrobats and doing odd jobs while hanging out backstage at theaters. At 16, he would travel by ship to the United States, where he would eventually change his name to Cary Grant after signing his first movie contract in 1931. He became one of the most admired and beloved leading men that Hollywood would ever produce.

Grant’s suave looks and elegant voice served him well when he started acting in films, but his artistry and nuance on screen matured considerably over the years. He would work with the master Alfred Hitchcock several times, including “North by Northwest,” “Notorious” and “To Catch a Thief.” Grant was also quite deft with comedy roles, including “His Girl Friday,” “The Awful Truth,” “Arsenic and Old Lace
See full article at Gold Derby »

Instant Family – Review

So the family’s all together for the big holiday, well why not head over to the multiplex to enjoy a family film? And hey, “family” is even in the title. That’s what the studios are counting on, hoping audiences will go for a breezy all-ages comedy in between those somber awards contenders. Most of the time, the studios will go a couple of different ways with a “family” comedy/drama. Either it’s a multi-generational gathering of uncles and cousins like Parenthood and more recently, the reviled Love The Coopers, or it’s about a family with lots and lots of kids like Cheaper By The Dozen (original and remake) along with blended families like Yours, Mine, And Ours (ditto), which begat that iconic TV show and its feature film The Brady Bunch Movie. But this new flick has fewer kids and a message. The filmmakers want to
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Lifeboat

When Alfred Hitchcock films are praised, this 1944 picture tends to get overlooked. Yet it hooks and holds audiences as strongly as any of the Master’s classics. When a handful of English and Americans are lost at sea, survival depends on their ability to cooperate. Can they trust the experienced sea captain — a German — who joins them? And when things become grim, will their behavior be any better than his?

Lifeboat

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 96 min. /Street Date March 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix, Walter Slezak, Mary Anderson, John Hodiak, Henry Hull, Heather Angel, Hume Cronyn, Canada Lee

Cinematography: Glen MacWilliams

Art Direction: James Basevi, Maurice Ransford

Film Editor: Dorothy Spencer

Original Music: Hugo W. Friedhofer

Written by: Jo Swerling, story by John Steinbeck

Produced by Kenneth Macgowan

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock goes to war, this time for 20th
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Close-Up on Leo McCarey’s "The Awful Truth": Love and Remarriage

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Leo McCarey's The Awful Truth (1937) is showing February 13 - March 15, 2017 in the United Kingdom in the series The Rom Com Variations.Leo McCarey’s 1937 screwball classic The Awful Truth is the epitome of a sub-genre dubbed by philosopher Stanley Cavell the “comedy of remarriage.” In the film, husband and wife Jerry and Lucy Warriner (Cary Grant and Irene Dunne) succumb to their marital suspicions and embark on an easier-said-than-done divorce. He returns home from an unspecified dalliance, complete with fake Florida tan (ever the gentleman, he bronzes so as to save Lucy the embarrassment of getting asked why her husband looks pale after spending time in the sun), but upon his arrival, Lucy herself is nowhere to be found. She must be with her Aunt Patsy, Jerry assures his guests, that is until Aunt Patsy (Cecil Cunningham) shows up sans niece.
See full article at MUBI »

Looking Back 75 Years: The War on Film

  • Cinelinx
This month, Cinelinx is taking you on a trip back through time. Join us as we examine how movies have changed over the last 100 years. This week, we’re going back 75 years to 1942.

This article is part 2 of 4 in a series.

Read Part 1 Here: Looking Back 100 Years: The Birth of Classic Hollywood

It was 1942 and the world was involved in yet another massive war. Nazi Germany was in control of continental Europe, and they were pushing into the Soviet Union. In one of the darkest events in human history, the Nazis’ Holocaust efforts were ramped up with the opening of the concentration camps. On the other side of the world, Japan was invading the island nations of the Pacific as they expanded their domain eastward towards the United States. The Us had just entered the war and its first troops arrived in Europe.

The war affected many aspects of everyday life,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Suspicion

Alfred Hitchcock assembles all the right elements for this respected mystery thriller. Joan Fontaine is concerned that her new hubby Cary Grant plans to murder her. But Hitch wasn't able to use the twist ending that attracted him to the story in the first place! Suspicion Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 99 min. / Street Date , 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Joan Fontaine, Cary Grant, Cedric Hardwicke, Nigel Bruce, Dame May Whitty, Auriol Lee, Leo G. Carroll Cinematography Harry Stradling Art Direction Van Nest Polglase Film Editor William Hamilton Original Music Franz Waxman Written by Samson Raphaelson, Joan Harrison, Alma Reville from the novel Before the Fact by Francis Iles (Anthony Berkeley) Produced and Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Some movies don't get better as time goes on. Alfred Hitchcock got himself painted into a corner on this one, perhaps not realizing that in America,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Best Unnominated Performances from This Year's Oscar-Nominated Actors

  • Indiewire
The Best Unnominated Performances from This Year's Oscar-Nominated Actors
Sometimes (Ok, frequently) the Academy drops the ball. Cary Grant gave his fair share of pantheon performances ("His Girl Friday," "Bringing Up Baby," "The Awful Truth"), none of which garnered him a nomination for Best Actor (he was instead honored for "Penny Serenade" and "None But the Lonely Heart"). Ingrid Bergman's work in "Casablanca," "Notorious" and "Stromboli" was similarly ignored. This year's Oscar candidates are no different, and with that in mind, here are the 15 best performances from the current acting nominees that weren't nominated for an Oscar.  Patricia Arquette, "Lost Highway" (1997)"Lost Highway" is sometimes overshadowed by David Lynch's later masterpiece "Mulholland Drive," but it's a rewarding film in its own right, a nightmarish look at repressed guilt, barely-hidden jealousy and self-deception. Arquette (giving a canny double-performance as...
See full article at Indiewire »

Mommy (2014) – The Review

Over the years film goers have been treated to movies touting the joys of parenthood such as Penny Serenade, Yours, Mine, And Ours, and, for most of its story, Parenthood. But what about the opposite end of the spectrum, when raising your sibling becomes more than a bit difficult. More harrowing than the comedy slapstick of the Problem Child series, but not the melodramatic themes of The Bad Seed or The Good Son. In his newest film French-Canadian actor/director/writer Xavier Dolan mixes in a touch of futuristic “what if” to shine a spotlight on the struggles of many fractured modern-day families. It’s the tale of the tug-of-war between a violent, troubled teenager and his overwhelmed widowed Mommy.

A brief prologue printed in white letters on a black screen tells us that we’re now a couple of years in the future after a 2015 change in Canada’s
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

If We Had Oscar Ballots... a 1941 Extra

Tomorrow when the Supporting Actress Smackdown 1941 hits, we'll just be discussing the five nominees (24 more hours to get your ballots in for the reader's section of the vote!). As it should be. But for the first time in a Smackdown I polled my fellow panelists as to who they would have nominated if, uh, they'd have been alive in 1941 and if, uh, they'd been AMPAS members.

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde lust after Lana Turner & Ingrid Bergman. And so does our panel.

Angelica and I didn't vote (I haven't seen enough 1941 pictures, I confess) but our other three panelists have recommendations for you outside the Oscar shortlist. In fact, all three of them only co-signed 2 of Oscar's 5 choices... different ones mostly so the Smackdown should be interesting (I'm not telling you which as the critiques come tomorrow!). So here are some For Your Considerations for your rental queues or your
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Broken Circle Breakdown review: a mournful tune

Electric sexiness and very modern motifs overlie a wonderfully old-fashioned melodrama… a highly gratifying one, if you enjoy a good ol’ weep. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read or seen the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

It’s a love story, and not a particularly happy one, but it is highly gratifying… if you enjoy a good ol’ weep. Like a modern version of the 1941 Irene Dunne-Cary Grant tearjerker Penny Serenade, this is the tale of Didier (Johan Heldenbergh), a bluegrass musician, and Elise (Veerle Baetens), a tattoo artist, their romance and marriage, and how the diagnosis of cancer in their little daughter, Maybelle (Nell Cattrysse), strains their relationship. The electric sexiness of the chemistry between Heldenbergh and Baetens and the very modern motifs threading through the film — the deeply held significance
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

films to stream in the Us week of Sep 24 2013 (Netflix/Amazon Instant)

What’s new, what’s hot, and what you may have missed, now available to stream on Netflix and Amazon Instant Video.

streaming now, while it’s still in theaters

The Colony: a small-scale science-fiction horror story full of big, troubling ideas about what a new Dark Ages might look like [my review] [at Amazon Instant Video]

streaming now, before it’s on dvd

Much Ado About Nothing: pure cinematic joy from Joss Whedon and Co.; a smart, snappy adaptation of perhaps Shakespeare’s funniest play, performed by supremely talented people having an enormous amount of infectious fun [my review] [at Amazon Instant Video] The Purge: mixes science fiction speculation with familiar horror tropes to create a startling satire on America’s culture of violence [my review] [at Amazon Instant Video] This Is the End: hugely funny jape in which the entire cast is having a ball making fun of themselves and the incongruity of the endless celebration that is L.A. facing the apocalypse [my review] [at Amazon Instant Video]

because
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Ted McGinley, patron saint of shark-jumping, visits 'Mad Men': We investigate his 'show-killing' career -- Video

Ted McGinley, patron saint of shark-jumping, visits 'Mad Men': We investigate his 'show-killing' career -- Video
Mad Men’s casting department really has a knack for finding buzzworthy, nostalgia-baiting guest stars. Refugees from Gen Y touchstones like The Secret World of Alex Mack, Saved by the Bell, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer have been showing up on the series for years. Last season, Pete Campbell — himself played by a veteran of The WB — romanced Rory Gilmore both on and off-camera. This season, Don Draper’s doing the same with Freaks and Geeks’s Lindsay Weir.

And last night, the show dipped even further into the nostalgia well by bringing in a TV ringer with one of
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

EW's Morning Bite: And the best sound bite from last night is...

EW's Morning Bite: And the best sound bite from last night is...
Submitted by Lecaves:

”I don’t distrust you because you’re a woman. I distrust you because you’re not as smart as you think.”

–Tywin Lannister (Charles Dance) talking to Cersei (Lena Headey) on Game of Thrones

Check out all your soundbites from Sunday April 21 and come back tonight to share your pick for best sound bite!

Read more:

Game of Thrones recap: Enter the Dragon

Mad Men recap: Penny Serenade

Game of Thrones Emilia Clarke, producers talk tonight’s stunning dragon unleashing
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

TV on Tap: "Glee" Grabs Katey Sagal, Comedy Central takes the Late Night Crown and "Mad Men" Style Returns to Sunday Nights

Angela Lansbury talking show tunes!

That's why you should be excited about a new season of Michael Feinstein's American Songbook.

News

FX has issued an apology to fans of The Americans who found their DVR recordings cut off early. The episode ran for 67 minutes but listings had the run time going for an hour, meaning many viewers missed vital scenes. FX is putting the full episode online for viewers to catch up.

The next target for Adult Swim — 80s detective shows. Deadline reports that the late night block has ordered a new live action series, Hole to Hole, that will parody 80s detective shows.

Since I find Artie one of the more toxic characters on Glee, I didn't expect to be excited at the thought of meeting his mother, but she's going to be played by Katey Sagal (who was once one of Bette Midler's Harlettes) which suddenly has
See full article at The Backlot »

Cher to Kick Off TCM’s New Friday Night Spotlight – A Woman’s World: The Defining Era of Women In Film

Cher, the Oscar®, Emmy®, Grammy®, Cannes Film Festival and three-time Golden Globe® award winner is set to be the first host of Friday Night Spotlight, a brand new film showcase launching April 5 on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). TCM host Robert Osborne will join Cher to kick off the franchise with A Woman’s World: The Defining Era of Women in Film, a collection of 17 films handpicked by Cher to illustrate the evolving roles of women from the late 1930s to the early ’50s. Each month thereafter, Friday Night Spotlight will feature a celebrity or expert host who will take viewers through a collection of films focusing on a specific topic.

A Woman’s World: The Defining Era of Women in Film will start Friday, April 5, at 8 p.m. (Et) with Cher and Osborne hosting a night of movies focusing on motherhood, beginning with Joan Crawford’s Oscar®-winning performance in
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Clip joint: Timepieces

A timely look at scenes involving watches and clocks

This week's Clip joint is by Maddy Potts. Think you can do better? Email your idea for a future Clip joint to adam.boult@guardian.co.uk

Clocks – the ticking over of hands or the neon glow of shape-shifting digits – an obvious but surprisingly diverse metaphor. They indicate the passing of time, they suggest ageing and they create suspense. They're the visual cue for a concept otherwise tough to portray in cinema – the almost incomprehensible inevitability of time. Characters can run out of it, be up against it or waste it, but the humble clock will play the lead in the cliche. For that reason, timepieces have found themselves being double-checked, wound up, smashed and hung on to for dear life in some of the most iconic moments in cinema.

1. About Schmidt

The opening scene of Alexander Payne's bleak comedy shows Jack Nicholson as Schmidt,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Write Combination: Alfred Hitchcock and John Michael Hayes (Part 1)

Trevor Hogg delves into Writing with Hitchcock by Steve DeRosa to explore the collaborations of director Alfred Hitchcock and screenwriter John Michael Hayes in the first of a two part feature...

“A lot of people embrace the auteur theory,” observed legendary filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. “But it’s difficult to know what someone means by it. I suppose they mean that the responsibility of the film rests solely on the shoulders of the director. But very often the director is no better than his script.” Arguably, the most fruitful collaboration for Hitchcock was with American screenwriter John Michael Hayes; within a two period they produced Rear Window (1954), To Catch a Thief (1955), The Trouble with Harry (1955), and the remake of The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956).

Recalling how he became creatively involved with the British moviemaker, John Michael Hayes told Steve DeRosa, the author of Writing with Hitchcock, “Hitchcock had his agents
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

George Stevens on TCM: Katharine Hepburn’s Alice Adams, Irene Dunne’s I Remember Mama

Philip Dorn, Barbara Bel Geddes, Steve Brown, Irene Dunne, I Remember Mama George Stevens‘ film series on Turner Classic Movies continues tonight with a potpourri of films: the romantic drama Alice Adams (1935), the period comedy Quality Street (1937), the family drama I Remember Mama (1948), the tearjerker Penny Serenade (1941), and the light comedy Bachelor Bait (1934). By now, Alice Adams is already over. The film is a tad dated, but Katharine Hepburn remains impressive as the small-town girl who wants to belong to both high society and Fred MacMurray. Why she’d pine for MacMurray’s character, I don’t know, but Hepburn beautifully conveys youthful heartbreak. (Not that older people can’t feel the same.) Hepburn might have won the Best Actress Academy [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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