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Penny Serenade (1941) Poster

Trivia

Irene Dunne often said that this was her favorite film because it reminded her of her own adopted daughter. However, in a letter to, at least, one fan she wrote that Love Affair (1939) was the top favorite of all her films.
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Third of three movies that paired Cary Grant and Irene Dunne, following The Awful Truth (1937) and My Favorite Wife (1940). In all three, they played spouses.
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In a flagrant disregard of the then Production Code, it would appear that Irene Dunne and Cary Grant share a marital bed instead of separate ones. Also, there's an implication that the two have sex on a train, something unheard of in the morally hidebound 1940s.
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Cary Grant, one of the cinema's greatest comedic actors, was only ever nominated twice for an Academy Award for Best Actor, in both instances for lesser-known dramatic roles. This was one of them, followed three years later by None But the Lonely Heart (1944).
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In real life, Cary Grant wouldn't become a parent until 1966 when he was 62.
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The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
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Grant was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor, losing at the 14th Academy Awards to Gary Cooper's portrayal of Sergeant York (1941).
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"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on November 16, 1941 with Cary Grant and Irene Dunne reprising their film roles.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on April 27, 1942 with Beulah Bondi reprising her film role.
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Irene Dunne and Cary Grant both starred in different versions of the same famous story. Irene Dunne was the female lead in the original Love Affair (1939) opposite Charles Boyer. Cary Grant was the male lead in the remake An Affair to Remember (1957).
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It appears Julie and Roger were in Japan c. 1930. The song "You Were Meant for Me" came out in 1929 and the yen-dollar exchange rate was about 2:1 in 1930-1931. The 2,000 yen Roger tells Julie the household costs in Japan would equal the $1,000 he says. That would equate to $14,500 in 2017, and to ~$15,300 in 2019.
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Cinematographer Franz Planer started the film, but became seriously ill and had to withdraw. He was replaced by Joseph Walker.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on May 8, 1944 with Irene Dunne reprising her film role.
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Prior to hiring Georges Stevens as a director for Columbia Pictures, Harry Cohn, the big boss of the studio, promised him to never interfere in Stevens's directing job, but Cohn only asked him not to smoke on the set, Inside the studio. Stevens eventually followed the orders and smoked behind Cohn's back.
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At the end of the film when Irene Dunne is finished playing the records, her dress is totally different than what she started out with at the beginning.
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Finnish censorship visa register # T-24247 delivered on 30-3-1995.
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Future director William Castle was a dialogue director on the set, learning the job with Stevens the director. Suddenly, Castle interfered in a dialogue scene between Cary Grant and Irene Dunne, and that provoked the wrath of Stevens. Cary Grant eventually went to calm Stevens down, saying that Castle was absolutely right.
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Was released on Blu-ray by Olive Films in 2013.
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Closing credits: The characters and incidents portrayed and the names used herein are fictional and any similarity to the name, character or history of any person is entirely accidental and unintentional.
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