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David Lean movies: All 16 films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ ‘Bridge on the River Kwai,’ ‘Doctor Zhivago’

  • Gold Derby
David Lean movies: All 16 films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Lawrence of Arabia,’ ‘Bridge on the River Kwai,’ ‘Doctor Zhivago’
David Lean would’ve celebrated his 111th birthday on March 25, 2019. The Oscar-winning director became famous for a series of visual striking, technically ambitious epics, but how many of those titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 16 of his films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1908, Lean cut his teeth as a film editor, cutting a number of prominent movies including “49th Parallel” (1941) and “One of Our Aircraft Is Missing” (1942) for his contemporary, Michael Powell. He transitioned into directing, working alongside acclaimed playwright Noel Coward with “In Which We Serve” (1942). The WWII Naval epic was a joint venture for the two, with Coward (who also wrote and starred) handling the acting scenes and Lean tackling the action sequences.

SEEOscar Best Director Gallery: Every Winner In Academy Award History

He earned his first Oscar nominations for writing and directing “Brief Encounter” (1945), a big
See full article at Gold Derby »

David Lean movies: All 16 films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
David Lean movies: All 16 films ranked worst to best
David Lean would’ve celebrated his 111th birthday on March 25, 2019. The Oscar-winning director became famous for a series of visual striking, technically ambitious epics, but how many of those titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at all 16 of his films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1908, Lean cut his teeth as a film editor, cutting a number of prominent movies including “49th Parallel” (1941) and “One of Our Aircraft Is Missing” (1942) for his contemporary, Michael Powell. He transitioned into directing, working alongside acclaimed playwright Noel Coward with “In Which We Serve” (1942). The WWII Naval epic was a joint venture for the two, with Coward (who also wrote and starred) handling the acting scenes and Lean tackling the action sequences.

He earned his first Oscar nominations for writing and directing “Brief Encounter” (1945), a big screen version of Coward’s play about two strangers (Trevor Howard
See full article at Gold Derby »

Michael Anderson, ‘Logan’s Run’ and ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ Director, Dies at 98

Michael Anderson, ‘Logan’s Run’ and ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ Director, Dies at 98
Michael Anderson, the British filmmaker who directed the 1956 Oscar Best Picture winner “Around the World in 80 Days,” died of heart disease in Canada on April 25, according to a spokesperson for the family. He was 98.

In a career that spanned decades, Anderson also won acclaim for the 1955 WWII film “The Dam Busters,” as well as 1976’s influential sci-fi movie “Logan’s Run,” about a dystopian future in which everyone is killed off when they reach the age of 30.

The son of an actor, Anderson landed small acting roles in his teens, and then worked as an office boy and later assistant director at London’s Elstree Studios on films like “Pygmalion” and Noel Coward’s “In Which We Serve,” the Times of London reported.

Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2018 (Photos)

He served in the Royal Signals Corps in WWII, then returned to the British film industry. “The Dam Busters,” starring Michael Redgrave and Richard Todd as British airmen who help devise an effective system of aerial bombing, won critical raves for its accuracy — and earned an Oscar nomination for special effects.

The success of “The Dam Busters” led Anderson to Hollywood — and the epic scale of “Around the World in 80 Days,” with its star-studded cast, 110 locations and 68,000 extras. The film got middling reviews but was a giant hit, winning five Oscars. (Anderson himself lost to George Stevens for “Giant.”)

Also Read: Ryan Gosling to 'Logan's Run,' Dominic Cooper biting into 'Vampire Hunter'

He followed that success with films like 1965’s “Operation Crossbow,” 1966’s “The Quiller Memorandum” and 1968’s “The Shoes of the Fishermen.”

In the ’70s, Anderson drifted from action thrillers into science fiction with the 1976 hit “Logan’s Run,” starring Michael York. Four years later, he directed Rock Hudson in a TV miniseries adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s “The Martian Chronicles.”

Read original story Michael Anderson, ‘Logan’s Run’ and ‘Around the World in 80 Days’ Director, Dies at 98 At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Honorary Oscars: A look back at 90 years, from Charlie Chaplin to Bob Hope to Donald Sutherland

Honorary Oscars: A look back at 90 years, from Charlie Chaplin to Bob Hope to Donald Sutherland
Over the decades, special or honorary Oscars have gone to everything from a film series to animated shorts to innovators to a ventriloquist to child performers to foreign films. Tour our photo galleries for a look back featuring every performer honored (above) and every non-performer honored (below).

Two special awards were handed out at the first Academy Awards on May 16, 1929:

Charlie Chaplin, who had originally been nominated for lead actor and for comedy direction for his 1928 masterpiece “The Circus,” was withdrawn from those nominations when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences’ Board of Governors gave him a special award for his “versatility in writing, acting, directing and producing” the comedy.

Warner Brothers also picked up a special honorary for producing 1927’s “The Jazz Singer”-“the pioneer outstanding talking picture, which has revolutionized the industry”.

Now called honorary Oscars, Donald Sutherland, cinematographer Owen Roizman (“The French Connection,” “The Exorcist
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Speed of Passion: Close-Up on David Lean’s "Breaking the Sound Barrier"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. David Lean's Breaking the Sound Barrier (1952) is playing October 14 - November 13, 2017 on Mubi in the United States.John (J.R.) Ridgefield is a man possessed. The wealthy and influential aircraft industrialist is consumed by his desire to manufacture a plane capable of penetrating the inscrutable sound barrier. This supersonic obsession is a blessing and a curse for the Ridgefield family, providing their ample fortune and triggering largely latent rifts in their ancestral relations. It’s an opposition at the heart and soul of David Lean’s 1952 film The Sound Barrier, a post-war endorsement of British ingenuity and determination, and an emotional, blazing depiction of sacrifice and scientific achievement. The opening of The Sound Barrier (also known as Sound Barrier and Breaking the Sound Barrier), spotlights Philip Peel (John Justin), one of the film’s principal test pilots. In just under two minutes,
See full article at MUBI »

Lifeboat

When Alfred Hitchcock films are praised, this 1944 picture tends to get overlooked. Yet it hooks and holds audiences as strongly as any of the Master’s classics. When a handful of English and Americans are lost at sea, survival depends on their ability to cooperate. Can they trust the experienced sea captain — a German — who joins them? And when things become grim, will their behavior be any better than his?

Lifeboat

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1944 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 96 min. /Street Date March 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix, Walter Slezak, Mary Anderson, John Hodiak, Henry Hull, Heather Angel, Hume Cronyn, Canada Lee

Cinematography: Glen MacWilliams

Art Direction: James Basevi, Maurice Ransford

Film Editor: Dorothy Spencer

Original Music: Hugo W. Friedhofer

Written by: Jo Swerling, story by John Steinbeck

Produced by Kenneth Macgowan

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock goes to war, this time for 20th
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Watch This: Noël Coward moves to film with the best kind of propaganda

One week a month, Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by the week’s new releases or premieres. This week: In honor of Kenneth Lonergan’s magnificent Manchester By The Sea, we’re giving a standing ovation to other movies written and/or directed by playwrights.

In Which We Serve (1942)

Playwright/songwriter/performer Noël Coward was born in 1899, and spent much of the 20th century documenting modern life in Great Britain. He wrote and sang about the rich and poor, finding commonalities of character across the social classes. He believed in the inherent virtue of his people—even when he found English folk funny or sad—and he converted his affection into activism during two world wars, offering his gifts to the military to use however they liked. By many accounts, Coward was willing to fight. But his country preferred that he entertain and uplift.

Coward made the ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Talking Pictures acquires 100+ films

  • ScreenDaily
Titles include classics such as The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

UK digital channel Talking Pictures TV has acquired some of the most iconic titles in British film history in two major library deals with ITV Studios Global Entertainment and the Samuel Goldwyn and Woodfall libraries, distributed by Miramax.

Talking Pictures TV, which broadcasts classic British movies on the Freeview and Sky platforms, has secured rights to more than 70 films from the ITV Studios Global Entertainment library and 33 films from the Samuel Goldwyn and Woodfall libraries through Miramax.

The ITV Studios Global Entertainment deal includes Lawrence Olivier’s Henry V; Reach For The Sky; Whistle Down The Wind; In Which We Serve; The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp; Hell Drivers; The Bulldog Breed; Séance on a Wet Afternoon; Defence of the Realm and Tarka The Otter.

Among the seminal films included in the Samuel Goldwyn and Woodfall deal are: The Entertainer; Loneliness of the Long
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Thn’s Top 5 Cinematographers Who Became Directors

This week sees the release of the Point Break remake, which is directed by Ericson Core, cinematographer on the original Fast and the Furious movie, Payback, and Ben Affleck’s Daredevil. Core also handles the camera on the Point Break movie, which we reviewed earlier this week.

The film opens in cinemas from Friday, so to celebrate, we thought we’d take a look at the other top cinematographers turned directors.

So, let’s begin…

Ronald Neame – (Born 1911 – Died 2010)

Ronald Neame is a great place to start; the prolific filmmaker started life in 1929 working as an assistant with Alfred Hitchcock on Blackmail, and eventually worked as the cinematographer for forty-seven films starting with Happy (1933). His later works included One Of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942) and Noel Coward’s In Which We Serve (1942). His final venture was another Coward-adapted play Blithe Spirit (1945), in which he worked with legendary director David Lean
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Cummings Pt.3: Gender-Bending from Joan of Arc to Comic Farce, Liberal Supporter of Political Refugees

'Saint Joan': Constance Cummings as the George Bernard Shaw heroine. Constance Cummings on stage: From sex-change farce and Emma Bovary to Juliet and 'Saint Joan' (See previous post: “Constance Cummings: Frank Capra, Mae West and Columbia Lawsuit.”) In the mid-1930s, Constance Cummings landed the title roles in two of husband Benn W. Levy's stage adaptations: Levy and Hubert Griffith's Young Madame Conti (1936), starring Cummings as a demimondaine who falls in love with a villainous character. She ends up killing him – or does she? Adapted from Bruno Frank's German-language original, Young Madame Conti was presented on both sides of the Atlantic; on Broadway, it had a brief run in spring 1937 at the Music Box Theatre. Based on the Gustave Flaubert novel, the Theatre Guild-produced Madame Bovary (1937) was staged in late fall at Broadway's Broadhurst Theatre. Referring to the London production of Young Madame Conti, The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

British Film Noir Collection | DVD Review

In a novel effort to stress that film noir wasn’t a film movement specifically an output solely produced for American audiences, Kino Lorber releases a five disc set of obscure noir examples released in the UK. Spanning a near ten year period from 1943 to 1952, the titles displayed here do seem to chart a progression in tone, at least resulting in parallels with American counterparts. Though a couple of the selections here aren’t very noteworthy, either as artifacts of British noir or items worthy of reappraisal, it does contain items of considerable interest, including rare titles from forgotten or underrated auteurs like Ronald Neame, Roy Ward Baker, and Ralph Thomas.

They Met in the Dark

The earliest title in this collection is a 1943 title from Karel Lamac, They Met in the Dark, a pseudo-comedy noir that barely meets the criteria. Based on a novel by Anthony Gilbert (whose novel
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Richard Attenborough - A Sky Movies Tribute

Sky Movies pays tribute to Richard Attenborough, the Oscar-winning director and actor who has died aged 90. Lord Attenborough was a hugely successful actor and director with a career that spanned over 60 years. His first acting role was in 1942's In Which We Serve, and he went on to play a huge variety of roles over the next 60 years, from British gangsters to wild-eyes scientists.
See full article at Sky Movies »

The First and Final Films of Richard Attenborough

This isn’t the story of a ship, but it starts with one. A month after the real-life Royal Navy resupplied Malta during Operation Pedestal, In Which We Serve hit theaters in the UK. It’s a WWII story made and released during WWII, featuring the sinking of the Hms Torrin as a symbol for the temporary loss that makes us all fight harder for the larger victory. A seafaring Alamo whose stalwart captain goes on to fire even larger guns from an even stouter ship at the destined-to-fail Nazis. This was Richard Attenborough‘s film debut as an actor. He played a yellow-gutted shell loader who abandons his post, leaving the men up top without one of their ammo sources. It’s a role hidden within a sea of other characters, but Attenborough — whose character doesn’t even have a name — gets a spotlit moment to twist his face in terror until ultimately breaking. The
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Richard Attenborough, Oscar-Winning Director And Acclaimed Actor, Dies At 90

Director and actor Richard Attenborough has died at the age of 90. An acclaimed performer who seamlessly segued from working in front of the camera to behind it, Attenborough earned two Oscars for his illuminating biopic Gandhi, for Best Picture and Best Director at the 1983 ceremony.

That victory came after a long and fruitful career in cinema for Attenborough, which began with an uncredited role as a deserting sailor in 1942 pic In Which We Serve. The British actor’s breakthrough role came five years later, in John Boulting’s adaptation of the Graham Greene novel Brighton Rock. From there, Attenborough’s star continued to climb. He would go on to work prolifically in British cinema, appearing in many comedies including Private’s Progress and I’m All Right Jack. Attenborough also succeeded on the stage, leading the West End production of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap for a time.

The actor
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Rip Richard Attenborough

  • TheMovieBit
I heard the news last night, but after my sixth ten hour shift in a row at my day job, my sleep addled brain couldn't, or just downright refused, to process the information. But now, with a healthy amount of sleep backing me up, it hit me like a freight train: Richard Attenborough, five days before his 91st birthday, has passed away. The world of cinema has lost another legend. And that is exactly what Richard Attenborough was. A legend. No matter what aspect he tried his hand at, he added so much to the cinematic landscape. It was in the last years of his teens, that he made the jump from the stage to the screen with an uncredited role 1942's In Which We Serve. It would be five years later that Brighton Rock would deliver his breakthrough role as psychotic hoodlum Pinkie Brown. After over twenty years in front of the camera,
See full article at TheMovieBit »

Lord Richard Attenborough Passes Away at 90

We regret to inform you that Lord Richard Attenborough, whose career as an actor and then filmmaker spanned nearly seventy years, has passed away at 90, just five days short of his birthday on August 29th. Attenborough died earlier today in west London, according to his son. The two-time Oscar-winner Attenborough had continuously struggled with health problems since he suffered a stroke in 2008; last year, he moved into a nursing home, in order to be with his wife.

Born Richard Samuel Attenborough on August 29th, 1923 in Cambridge, England, Mr. Attenborough enlisted in the Royal Air Force during WWII; he ended up acting in such wartime propaganda films as Noël Coward’s In Which We Serve (1942) and John Boulting’s Journey Together (1943), where Attenborough appeared opposite ...

Click to continue reading Lord Richard Attenborough Passes Away at 90
See full article at Screen Rant »

Filmmaker Richard Attenborough Dead at 90

Filmmaker Richard Attenborough Dead at 90
Richard Attenborough, the acclaimed British actor and director who made the Oscar-winning epic Gandhi, died on Sunday at the age of 90. His son shared the news with the BBC, which reports that Attenborough had been in poor health for many years.

British Prime Minister David Cameron praised the beloved filmmaker in a Tweet on Sunday afternoon. "His acting in 'Brighton Rock' was brilliant, his directing of 'Gandhi' was stunning - Richard Attenborough was one of the greats of cinema."

Attenborough was born in 1923 in Cambridge, England
See full article at Rolling Stone »

British actor-director Richard Attenborough dies at 90

British actor-director Richard Attenborough dies at 90
English actor-director Richard Attenborough died Sunday, his son Michael told the BBC. He was 90.

The Cambridge, England, native made his film debut at 19 in the 1942 war film In Which We Serve, which was later nominated for Best Picture at the 1943 Academy Awards.

Over the course of the next 60 years, Attenborough appeared in more than 70 films, including Brighton Rock, The Great Escape, and The Sand Pebbles. He also appeared in a number of family favorites such as Doctor Doolittle, Jurassic Park, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, and played Kris Kringle in the 1994 reboot of Miracle on 34th Street.

An accomplished filmmaker,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Richard Attenborough Appreciation: A True Filmmaking Giant On Both Sides Of The Camera

Richard Attenborough Appreciation: A True Filmmaking Giant On Both Sides Of The Camera
Lord Richard Attenborough was an Oscar winner. In fact he had two Oscars for both producing and directing 1982’s elegant epic biopic, Gandhi. But considering the breadth of his career not only in those capacities, but particularly as an actor, it is astounding to me that the Gandhi wins represented his only nominations in a six-decade career that memorably started with the British World War II classic In Which We Serve in 1942. As an actor, Attenborough deserved far better than he got from the Academy.

It’s almost criminal, for instance, that he was overlooked in 1964 for his creepy performance in Seance on a Wet Afternoon as Billy, the weak, complicit husband who gets involved in a kidnapping so his wife, played by the great Kim Stanley, could become famous as a psychic.

Stanley got a richly deserved Best Actress nomination that year but Attenborough, who also produced the film,
See full article at Deadline Movie News »
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