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Repertory Theatre 

The Philco Television Playhouse (original title)
This live dramatic series featured original stories and adaptations of novels, plays, et cetera during its eight year run. During the first year, the show was sponsored by the Actor's ... See full summary »
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8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1956   1955   1954   1953   1952   1951   … See all »
Nominated for 7 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Bert Lytell ...  Himself - Host / ... 54 episodes, 1948-1955
Jay Jackson Jay Jackson ...  Announcer / ... 43 episodes, 1950-1955
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Storyline

This live dramatic series featured original stories and adaptations of novels, plays, et cetera during its eight year run. During the first year, the show was sponsored by the Actor's Equity Association, and featured adaptations of Broadway plays and musicals. Bert Lytell, the former President of the Association, acted as host. During the second season, an agreement was made with the Book-of-the-Month Club, and the plays were adaptations of current novels. Starting in the third season, the television plays were adaptations of plays, novels, dramas, et cetera by known and unknown authors. The title of the show was changed to "Repertory Theatre" (1949) for episodes 1.29 to 1.31 and "Arena Theatre" (1949) for episodes 1.32 to 1.38. Effective with episode 1.39, the original title was used. Starting with the fourth season, this show alternated weekly with "The Goodyear Theatre" (1951); starting in the eighth season, this program alternated with "The Goodyear Theatre" (1951) and "The ALCOA ... Written by J.E. McKillop <jack-mckillop@worldnet.att.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 October 1948 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Arena Theatre See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Showcase Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the fourth through seventh seasons (October 1951 to August 1955), this show alternated with Goodyear Theatre (1957). See more »

Connections

Featured in Grace Kelly: The American Princess (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

Salute to Industry
By Morris Mamorsky
See more »

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User Reviews

 
It really was the Golden Age of Television.
16 October 1999 | by Hup234!See all my reviews

As we enter Y2K, it's good to look back on such terrific programs as The Philco Television Playhouse (so named for a time when one sponsor would pick up the whole tab for the series), when the production people strove for excellence, to do the very best they could on the air for their audience, and when actual thought and attention to the on-screen activities was mandatory. (It was for programs such as this that the "TV Dinner" was created, for better or worse. But at least there was something then to attract our continuous attention.) Philco Television Playhouse and the other anthologies of the day were very, very good television, indeed.


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