6.7/10
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9 user 7 critic

The Glass Web (1953)

Passed | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 14 May 1954 (France)
A beautiful but heartless television actress, uses seduction and tricks to blackmail the men in her life to a point, where she could get herself killed.

Director:

Jack Arnold

Writers:

Robert Blees (screenplay), Leonard Lee (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Edward G. Robinson ... Henry Hayes
John Forsythe ... Don Newell
Kathleen Hughes ... Paula Ranier
Marcia Henderson ... Louise Newell
Richard Denning ... Dave Markson
Hugh Sanders ... Police Lt. Mike Stevens
Jean Willes ... Sonia
Eve McVeagh Eve McVeagh ... Viv
Harry Tyler ... Jake (as Harry O. Tyler)
John Hiestand John Hiestand ... Announcer
Clark Howat ... Bob Warren
Robert Nelson Robert Nelson ... Plainclothesman (as Bob Nelson)
John Verros John Verros ... Fred Abbott
Helen Wallace ... Mrs. Doyle
Benny Rubin ... Tramp Comic
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Storyline

The ice-cold diva Paula ruthlessly exploits the guys she dates. While blackmailing the married Don with a recent one-night-stand, she has a secret affair with Henry, who works as researcher for the weekly authentic TV show "Crime of the Week", which Don writes for. When Henry fails to help her to a role, she insults him deadly... and ends up dead herself. Now Don desperately tries to hide his traces, but Henry sabotages his efforts and suggests he write the unsolved murder case for next week's show... Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Ultimate in Shocking, Suspenseful 3-D! See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 May 1954 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Spin the Glass Web See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

2.00 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The second of Universal Pictures' 3-D films directed by Jack Arnold (the first was It Came from Outer Space (1953)), this movie was tested in both 2-D and 3-D. Audiences did not prefer the 3-D version and (as a result of sub-standard projection of the stereoscopic 3-D process and the resulting prejudice against 3-D) many preferred the 2-D, flat version of the film. The 3-D version was rarely, if ever shown. There is no evidence that the 3-D version ever opened commercially in Los Angeles and may not even have been shown in New York or other major cities. A 3-D print does exist today, proving (in addition to the studio records) that the film was completed in that format. It premiered in Hollywood 50 years after its production, on 17 September 2003 at 3D Film Expo at the Egyptian Theatre with Kathleen Hughes (Miss 3D) in attendance. See more »

Goofs

When Don drives with Henry to the studio and "takes the wrong road", the exterior shot at that moment shows him with what appears to be a female passenger instead of a character wearing a hat, as what Henry is wearing. See more »

Soundtracks

Blue Moon
(uncredited)
Music by Richard Rodgers
Lyrics by Lorenz Hart
Heard playing on a radio
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Set in early television, "3-D" thriller seems like early television
10 August 2002 | by bmacvSee all my reviews

Though much less stylish to look and (and listen to), The Glass Web owes a debt to Michael Curtiz' The Unsuspected of six years earlier. Both movies take as their principal setting a live true-crime show – the earlier in the waning days of radio, the latter in the dawning of the television era. And both make use of the technology of their respective mediums to help unravel their plots.

Head writer of the crime show John Forsythe and researcher Edward G. Robinson are at loggerheads; Robinson finds Forsythe callow and slapdash while Forsythe dismisses Robinson, a former police reporter, as an old fussbudget. Both men, however, are carrying on with the same woman, a Los Angeles television actress ( Kathleen Hughes) whose interest in them is entirely mercenary – apart from the professional advancement she schemes for, she's always got a hand out for `loans,' which then escalate into blackmail.

When she turns up strangled in her apartment, there's little weeping or gnashing of teeth. Robinson proposes turning the solving of her murder into their season-ending cliffhanger, sure to cinch a skittish sponsor. Both he and Forsythe turn in competing scripts; one of them, however, contains details which could have been known only to the killer....

Set in the world of early television, The Glass Web looks and feels like early television. But upon its release it was part of the early-1950s Hollywood panic over the upstart rival medium, and featured one of the desperate gimmicks calculated to lure viewers back into theaters: 3-D. Fortunately, the projectiles that got early spectators ducking in their seats are confined to a few intense spates and today look rather quaint (even in 3-D, they'd look quaint). Director Jack Arnold went on to make at least two movies that have been enshrined as camp classics: The Incredible Shrinking Man and High School Confidential. The Glass Web is nowhere near so memorable, but it's diverting enough in a don't-expect-much kind of way.


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