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The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967)

Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, History | 30 June 1967 (USA)
Trailer
2:31 | Trailer
Al Capone's Valentine's Day surprise for the rival Bugs Moran gang in 1929 Chicago.

Director:

Roger Corman

Writer:

Howard Browne
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jason Robards ... Al Capone
George Segal ... Peter Gusenberg
Ralph Meeker ... George Clarence 'Bugs' Moran
Jean Hale ... Myrtle
Clint Ritchie ... Jack McGurn
Frank Silvera ... Nick Sorello
Joseph Campanella ... Albert Wienshank
Richard Bakalyan ... John Scalise
David Canary ... Frank Gusenberg
Bruce Dern ... Johnny May
Harold J. Stone ... Frank Nitti
Kurt Kreuger ... James Clark
Paul Richards ... Charles Fischetti
Joe Turkel ... Jake 'Greasy Thumb' Guzik (as Joseph Turkel)
Milton Frome ... Adam Heyer
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Storyline

Chicago February 14th 1929. Al Capone finally establishes himself as the city's boss of organised crime. In a north-side garage his hoods, dressed as policemen, surprise and mow down with machine-guns the key members of Bugs Moran's rival gang. The film traces the history of the incident, and the lives affected and in some cases ended by it. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

They don't negotiate. They eliminate. See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | History

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

30 June 1967 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The St. Valentine's Day Massacre See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color (Color by Deluxe)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was Roger Corman's first directorial project for one of the major studios (20th Century-Fox). After approximately 15 years experience as a producer and director of low-budget productions, it was no surprise that HE wrapped this production ahead of schedule and well under budget. See more »

Goofs

When Capone is seen sitting in the Hawthorne Hotel dining room just before the big Moran shootout, his back is to the open reception area. No gangster, and few men in general, would ever sit in such a vulnerable position. See more »

Quotes

Capone: Wanna know something Jack? I like a guy who can use his head for something beside a hatrack!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Alice: The Valentine's Day Massacre (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

My Blue Heaven
(uncredited)
Written by Walter Donaldson and George Whiting
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Bears interesting comparison with THE GODFATHER.
15 June 2000 | by alice liddellSee all my reviews

It's incredible to think that this film, Roger Corman's major studio debut, and THE GODFATHER (made by Corman alumnus Coppola) were made within five years of each other. They could be decades apart, in look, in sensibility, in impact. Whereas GODFATHER gropes for a rich, mythic timelessness, MASSACRE seems brittle, thin, a mere pastiche of, variously, 30s Warners gangster films, 40s B-movies, or Corman's own early work. Whereas Coppola's characters have passed into popular culture, Corman's gangsters are thinly characterised, theatrical, parodic; whereas GODFATHER's plot is slow-burning, tense, silent, punctuated with shocking shards of tangible violence, MASSACRE is almost cartoon-like in its relentless gunfire, which, because it's not rooted in character, does not have as traumatic an effect.

Some of us, however, might recoil a little from the major film's more questionable posturing, and MASSACRE has many excellencies. Most immediately pleasurable is the plot, mathematically simple, as Corman narrates the titular bloodbath like a theorem, showing A (Capone) meeting B (Moran) to create C (the massacre). QED. Nothing is allowed interfere with this beautiful simplicity - every scene, every character, every action refers to this theorem alone. Even scenes which seem to illustrate character (eg Peter Gusenberg and Myrtle) only do so to 'explain' why one side got the better of another.

This quality extends to the film as a whole, which is a series of repetitions and mirroring scenes. Another pleasure is the voiceover, which again transforms a conventional narrative about real people into abstract formalism. Like a voice of God, it intrudes without warning, frequently, mixing bald factual details about all the players (eg Such and such, born 1893 in such a place, suspected gun-runner, killer etc., will die on 3 May 1957 of heart failure) with speculation. Before any character has even begun their parts in the film, their life stories are known to us. This robs them of everything that makes us human - motivation, hope, action. Sartre said we are what we do. Not here. Robbed of human characteristics, they become mere ciphers, playing out their inevitable fates, and denying the viewer the kind of emotional empathy that Coppola will dubiously over-indulge in.

Despite the (relatively) high budget, production values do nothing to make the film more realistic. Indeed, the uniformity of colour (predominantly grey), the repetition of scenes and places, the reduction of sequences to sheer functionality, makes the film increasingly artificial. The theatricality of the acting adds to this, with Robards especially hamming away to amusingly grand effect, but theatricality is embedded too, as narratively crucial scenes become sites for rhetoric, oratory, dramatic performance, an actor declaiming to an enrapt public, hanging (for dear life) to his every word.

Add to all this Corman's stunning, playful direction, confident and fluid, making interiors and objects live, fixing characters in their place. The violent scenes are expertly choreographed, if they aren't disturbing, their formal excellence is undiminished. All this formalism is not an empty, academic exercise. By revealing the phoniness of his subject matter, Corman reveals the processes of myth-making that, especially through the cinema, curiously glamourised an era, when America was in thrall to a number of violent fascists.

Corman is not seriously moralistic, he is cheerfully aware of human nature's strange pulls - he shows how the need for violence and sensation in cinema is close to the fascistic, but also undeniable. It is a trap Coppola doesn't always avoid. The score, which makes ragtime eerily modernist, is astounding, while Corman reveals, as in TALES OF TERROR, that he has a canny sense of the domestic's comic violence - the Pete/Myrtle scene is a hilarious-troubling classic.


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