Performance (1970) - News Poster

(1970)

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Be Cool, Break the Rules: The Double Edge of Transgression

  • MUBI
PerformanceA man forcibly stripped and smeared with dog shit; a kiss, carefully choreographed to evade the censor’s gaze; a liberated prisoner devouring a living, squirming squid: these images live beyond the constraints of their time, imprinted in my mind. They shock and they dare but, most of all, they hold power because they transgress the received rules of acceptability and decency.Subversive and transgressive images were almost omnipresent at Bristol’s Cinema Rediscovered festival, and with good reason. Many so-called great films are decorated as such precisely because they challenge: society is weighed, measured, and found wanting. Politically charged art seeks change, in part, through depiction and exposure, a process illustrated in Nicolas Roeg’s Performance (1970). The conservative and reactionary Chas (James Fox) undergoes transformation when confronted by the free love and multiculturalism of Turner’s (Mick Jagger) bohemian lifestyle. Transgression is an act that challenges dominant power structures,
See full article at MUBI »

Mick Jagger's Acting Comeback to Close Venice Film Fest

Tony Sokol Jul 25, 2019

Art heist film The Burnt Orange Heresy features Donald Sutherland catching rye and a Rolling Stone gathering moss.

Mick Jagger is making his movie comeback.

The lead singer of the Rolling Stones hasn't acted since 2001's The Man from Elysian Fields. He turned down the booty from a part in the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise but couldn't turn away from an erotic neo-noir art heist thriller. The Burnt Orange Heresy, which also stars Donald Sutherland as a reclusive artist in the Jd Salinger mold, will have its world premiere at the Venice International Film Festival on September 7, 2019, according to Variety. The film will close out the festival in with an out-of-competition screening in the Sala Grande after the awards ceremony.

Based on Charles Willeford's 1971 novel The Burnt Orange Heresy, the film was directed by Giuseppe Capotondi. When the movie was first announced, Christopher Walken was
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Performance’: Inside the Rock ‘n’ Roll Movie Too Shocking for the ’60s

  • Indiewire
‘Performance’: Inside the Rock ‘n’ Roll Movie Too Shocking for the ’60s
“Even the bath water was dirty.” According to director Nicolas Roeg, that was the reaction of an appalled Warner Bros. executive at a test screening of “Performance” in 1968, one that went so badly that even studio staff walked out. It was shelved for 18 months before being unceremoniously dumped into cinemas in 1970.

Fifty years later, it’s considered a classic. In his critically acclaimed Channel 4 documentary miniseries, “The Story of Film,” director and critic Mark Cousins said: “If any movie should be compulsory viewing for filmmakers, maybe this is it.” Co-directed by Roeg and Donald Cammell, “Performance” is sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll distilled to its purest visual expression. And now, a new limited-edition coffee-table book from Coattail Publications, “Performance: The Making of a Classic,” goes down the rabbit hole and reveals new details about the movie and its 1968 production.

In a phone interview, the book’s author admitted
See full article at Indiewire »

Nicolas Roeg remembered by Donald Sutherland

15 August 1928 – 23 November 2018

The actor who starred in Roeg’s 1973 masterpiece, Don’t Look Now, remembers a visionary director, and cinematographer, who changed his life for ever

Judy Blame remembered by Boy George

• Read the Observer’s obituaries of 2018 in full here

I was filming in Florida in the spring of 1972. My agent phoned to tell me a fellow named Nic Roeg wanted to speak with me about filming Daphne du Maurier’s Don’t Look Now. I didn’t know him. Didn’t know the story. So I bought a book of her stories and read it, read the script and then I screened Walkabout and Performance, the film he’d co-directed with Donald Cammell. I liked everything.

They gave me his phone number and I called him in London. He answered. There was a lot of background barking. A cacophonous chorus of Jack Russells. He and I talked through it.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

"Don't Look Now" 45Th Anniversary Screening, Beverly Hills, December 18

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Laemmle’s Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles will be presenting a 45th anniversary screening of Nicholas Roeg’s masterful 1973 thriller Don’t Look Now. The 110-minute film stars Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie as recently bereaved parents struggling to cope with the loss of their daughter, based upon the short story of the same name by author Daphne du Maurier and published in the 1971 story collection “Not After Midnight.”

The film will be screened on Tuesday, December 18th, 2018 at 7:30 pm.

Please Note: At press time the film’s cinematographer, Anthony Richmond, is scheduled to participate in a Q&A following the screening. Please Check Back With The Ahrya’S Website For Updates.

From the press release:

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a tribute to director Nicolas Roeg with a screening of his eerie, atmospheric thriller, 'Don’t Look Now.' Roeg,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

"Once I had it all. Now I just have everything": Nicolas Roeg Remembered

  • MUBI
It has become a cliché to quote the age-old maxim that you should never meet your heroes. I am also of the belief that you should never write about meeting them either. But I am going to make an exception for Nicolas Roeg, who passed away aged 90 on November 26, 2018. It’s commonly accepted, and certainly in the tributes that have flowed since his death, that Roeg was a genius of the cinema. In his lifetime he was not always held in such lofty regard, as his longtime friend and producing associate Jeremy Thomas was swift to point out when he chastised the U.K. film establishment for its neglect of one of its most visionary talents. “Roeg was one of the major figures but he wasn’t supported by the British Film Industry. There is something about our culture that we don’t revere our greatest filmmakers, especially if they
See full article at MUBI »

“You’ll look funny when you’re fifty.” A new book celebrates the 50th Anniversary of ‘Performance’

  • HeyUGuys
“ You’re a comical little geezer. You’ll look funny when you’re fifty.” James Fox as Chas to Mick Jagger as Turner in Performance.

Last weekend saw the loss of one of the UK’s finest and most admired filmmakers, Nicolas Roeg, who died at 90. 2018 also marks fifty years since the making of his first film as director, the BAFTA-nominated Performance, alongside co-director Donald Cammell starring James Fox, Mick Jagger and Anita Pallenberg.

To celebrate the anniversary a lavish 348 page book, Performance: The 50th Anniversary of the Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg Cinematic Classic, boasting over 500 images, many previously unseen by the public, will be published on 3rd December 2018, as James Kleinmann reports for HeyUGuys.

The book, by Jay Glennie, takes an in-depth look at the making of the hugely influential film, the reluctance of Warner Bros. to release it without substantial cuts, the initial critical reaction as well
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Nicolas Roeg, Bernardo Bertolucci and Another End of Another Era

Nicolas Roeg, Bernardo Bertolucci and Another End of Another Era
It’s always tough when giants shuffle off this mortal coil, but the twofer that hit film fans over the past few days has been a particularly hard blow. Early Saturday morning, word began to spread that Nicolas Roeg, the filmmaker behind The Man Who Fell to Earth, among others, had died at the age of 90. Then, just as folks were logging on to their computers today after a long holiday weekend, it was confirmed that Bernardo Bertolucci, the Oscar-winning director who helped channel what’s arguably Marlon Brando’s
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Director Nicolas Roeg Dead At Age 90

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Nicolas Roeg, the supremely talented British cinematographer who ultimately became an acclaimed director, has died at age 90. Roeg's unique eye for filming scenes in a creative manner gained him a reputation in the movie industry  in the 1960s. He was a second-unit photographer on David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" and contributed to Lean's "Doctor Zhivago". By 1964, he was credited as Director of Photography on Roger Corman's "The Masque of the Red Death", one of the most stylishly filmed Corman horror productions. Soon, he found himself constantly in demand. Other films he photographed included "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum", "Far from the Madding Crowd" and "Petulia". He also contributed to the 1967 spoof version of "Casino Royale".

Roeg next moved into the Director's chair with the bizarre and controversial 1970 crime film "Performance" that has since become a cult classic. Better received was
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Tributes pour in for director Nicolas Roeg

Tributes pour in for director Nicolas Roeg
London-born Roeg directed Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth, The Witches and Performance.

Nicolas Roeg, director of Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth and The Witches, has died aged 90.

His son, Nicolas Roeg Jr, told the BBC that he passed away yesterday (23 November).

Roeg was born in north London in 1928, beginning his career at Marylebone Studios.

After working as a cinematographer he made his directing debut (alongside Donald Cammell) with the controversial 1970 film Performance starring Mick Jagger, which was delayed for two years bacsue of its sexual content and violence.

His first solo outing was 1971’s Walkabout,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rip Nicolas Roeg

  • SneakPeek
Director, cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, noted for the features "Don't Look Now", "The Man Who Fell To Earth" And "Performance" has died:

Roeg started out as an editing apprentice, then worked his way up to become a second unit Dp on director David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962)...

...followed by Roger Corman's "The Masque of the Red Death" (1964)...

...François Truffaut's "Fahrenheit 451" (1966)...

...John Schlesinger's "Far from the Madding Crowd" (1967)...

...and Richard Lester's "Petulia" (1968).

Roeg made his co-directing debut with "Performance" (1970)...

...then went to Australia to solo direct and film the classic "Walkabout" (1971) starring Jenny Agutter.

Throughout the 1970's, Roeg produced an impressive amount of work, including "Don't Look Now" (1973) starring Donald Sutherland...

....and "The Man Who Fell to Earth" (1976) starring David Bowie.

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek the films of Nicolas Roeg...
See full article at SneakPeek »

Nicolas Roeg Has Passed Away

  • DailyDead
A wholly unique creative mind behind the camera, filmmaker Nicolas Roeg has passed away at the age of 90.

Multiple outlets, including BBC, report the news of Roeg's passing, with his son, Nicolas Jr., confirming that his dad passed away on Friday, November 23rd.

Roeg worked as a cinematographer on a multitude of films in the 1960s (including the 1966 adaptation of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451) before co-directing his first feature, Performance, in 1970. After that, there was no looking back for Roeg, who went on to helm more than 15 movies over the next four decades.

An endlessly imaginative filmmaker with a bold vision, Roeg's movies didn't just entertain viewers, they left indelible, profound marks on their psyches. Decades after their releases, movies such as Walkabout, The Man Who Fell to Earth (starring David Bowie), and Bad Timing continue to be exemplary cinematic efforts admired by filmmakers and viewers alike.

Roeg will
See full article at DailyDead »

Nicolas Roeg, ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth’ Director, Dies at 90

  • The Wrap
Nicolas Roeg, ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth’ Director, Dies at 90
Nicolas Roeg, the British filmmaker known for offbeat and often controversial films like “Performance,” “Don’t Look Now” and “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” has died at the age of 90.

Roeg’s son, Nicolas Roeg Jr, told the BBC that his father passed away late Friday night.

Getting his start as a cinematographer, Roeg rose through the industry in the 1960s, later going on to direct his own films in the ’70s and ’80s.

Also Read: Devin Lima, Lfo Singer, Dies at 41

His credits include Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger’s acting debut, “Performance,” in 1970; “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” led by a Ziggy Stardust-era David Bowie, in 1976; the Australia-set survival drama “Walkabout”; and the moody Julie Christie-Donald Sutherland thriller “Don’t Look Now.”

Roeg’s final film was the 1990 adaptation of Roald Dahl’s “The Witches” starring Anjelica Huston.

“Rip to Nicolas Roeg, a pioneering
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Dazzling, Fascinating’ Nicolas Roeg Remembered by Duncan Jones, Edgar Wright

  • Variety
‘Dazzling, Fascinating’ Nicolas Roeg Remembered by Duncan Jones, Edgar Wright
British director Nicolas Roeg, whose 1970s-era films such as “Don’t Look Now,” “The Man Who Fell to Earth” and “Performance” became touchstones for numerous budding filmmakers and cinephiles, died Friday.

Directors including Edgar Wright and Duncan Jones, whose father David Bowie starred in “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” were quick to remember Roeg’s visual mastery and complex storytelling. “Thank you for making so many brave choices and giving this little lad in pajamas an ongoing love of filmmaking,” Jones wrote.

Just heard another great storyteller, the inimitable Nicolas Roeg left us today. What an incredible body of work he’s left us with!

All my love to his family.

Thank you for making so many brave choices, & giving this strange little lad in pajamas an ongoing love of filmmaking. pic.twitter.com/QVg2znq3Rs

— Duncan Jones (@ManMadeMoon) November 24, 2018

Edgar Wright said “I could watch Don’t
See full article at Variety »

Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘Don’t Look Now’ and ‘Walkabout,’ Dies at 90

  • Indiewire
Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘Don’t Look Now’ and ‘Walkabout,’ Dies at 90
Nicolas Roeg, a distinctive voice in world cinema best known for directing “Don’t Look Now” and “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” has died at age 90. The filmmaker’s son, Nicolas Roeg Jr., confirmed the news with a brief note: “He was a genuine dad. He just had his 90th birthday in August.” No cause of death has been announced.

Released in 1973, “Don’t Look Now” stands as one of the most acclaimed horror films ever made — as well as one of the most controversial. Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland play a married couple mourning the death of their son in Roeg’s adaptation of the short story by Daphne du Maurier, and a graphic sex scene involving the two stars proved scandalous for years after the film’s release.

Roeg’s genre-spanning career, which began in 1970 with the Mick Jagger–starring “Performance,” also included “Walkabout,” “Bad Timing,” “Insignificance,
See full article at Indiewire »

Nicolas Roeg: a daring film-maker of passionate and visceral brilliance

Roeg will be remembered for a clutch of masterly films – including Don’t Look Now, the best scary movie of all time, and the unclassifiable Man Who Fell to Earth

A few years ago I wrote to Nic Roeg, explaining that I was working on a talk for the radio about his 1973 masterpiece Don’t Look Now, the story of how a couple’s dead child appears to make contact with them in the eerily dark and echoing waterways of Venice. He invited me to tea at his west London house – the elegant neighbourhood, incidentally, of his 1970 film Performance. We got on to the subject of the unspeakably painful “death” scene at the beginning in which the young daughter of Laura and John, the couple played by Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland, drowns in a garden pond while wearing the red anorak to which she is greatly attached.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Nicolas Roeg Dies: Film Director For ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’ Was 90

  • Deadline
Nicolas Roeg Dies: Film Director For ‘The Man Who Fell To Earth’ Was 90
Idiosyncratic film director Nicolas Roeg, whose odd but compelling films included Performance and The Man Who Fell To Earth, has died. He passed away on Friday night of undisclosed causes at age 90, according to his son.

Roeg’s work, which was often opaque and non-traditional, influenced a generation of filmmakers, but wasn’t widely accepted at first. Performance was almost not released, and later re-cut by Warner Bros., whose executives found it almost incomprehensible. It is now considered a classic, decades later.

Before directing, Roeg had built a solid reputation as a cinematographer, winning acclaim for his work on Far From The Madding Crowd and Fahrenheit 451, among others.

But it was his work on Performance that caused a stir. Co-directed with Donald Cammell, its non-linear narrative and dark tones recalled such auteurs as Jean-Luc Godard and Richard Lester. It became a signature piece, leading to such stylized and arty
See full article at Deadline »

Tributes pour in for director Nicolas Roeg, who has died aged 90

Tributes pour in for director Nicolas Roeg, who has died aged 90
London-born Roeg directed Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth, The Witches and Performance.

Nicolas Roeg, director of Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth and The Witches, has died aged 90.

His son, Nicolas Roeg Jr, told the BBC that he passed away yesterday (23 November).

Roeg was born in north London in 1928, beginning his career at Marylebone Studios.

After working as a cinematographer he made his directing debut (alongside Donald Cammell) with the controversial 1970 film Performance starring Mick Jagger, which was delayed for two years bacsue of its sexual content and violence.

His first solo outing was 1971’s Walkabout,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ ‘The Witches,’ Dies at 90

  • Variety
Nicolas Roeg, Director of ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth,’ ‘The Witches,’ Dies at 90
Director and noted cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, whose offbeat films included “Performance,” “Don’t Look Now,” “The Witches” and “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” has died. He was 90.

His son Nicolas Roeg Jr. told the BBC his father died Friday night.

A daring and influential craftsman, Roeg’s idiosyncratic films influenced filmmakers including Danny Boyle and Steven Soderbergh.

He worked his way up from the bottom of the business and by the 1960s was much in demand as a cinematographer, responsible for the lensing of films including “Petulia,” “Far From the Madding Crowd” and “Fahrenheit 451.”

The controversial, oddly compelling Mick Jagger-starring “Performance,” which Roeg co-directed with Donald Cammell, was almost not released and then was recut by Warner Bros.; execs at the studio found it incomprehensible as a gangster thriller. It was eventually recut, released in 1970 to modest business and decades later received widespread acclaim as a classic of British cinema.
See full article at Variety »

Nicolas Roeg, director of Don't Look Now and Walkabout, dies aged 90

Influential British director behind run of acclaimed movies in 1970s and early 80s dies

Nicolas Roeg, one of Britain’s most admired and influential film-makers, has died aged 90, his family has announced.

Roeg is best known for a run of acclaimed movies in the 1970s and early 80s, including horror Don’t Look Now, Australian outback drama Walkabout, The Man Who Fell to Earth (starring David Bowie), and Performance (starring Mick Jagger). He developed his own distinctive film-making style, usually involving puzzle-like, non-linear storytelling, lyrical visual imagery and challenging themes such as sex, death, horror and mental breakdown.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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