Soldier Blue (1970) - News Poster

(1970)

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Little Big Man (Region B)

Arthur Penn’s under-appreciated epic has everything a big-scale western could want — spectacle, interesting characters, good history and a sense of humor. Dustin Hoffman gets to play at least five characters in one as an ancient pioneer relating his career exploits — which are either outrageous tall tales or a concise history of the taking of The West.

Little Big Man

Region B Blu-ray

Koch Media

1970 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 139 147 min. / Available from Amazon.de / Street Date September 14, 2017 / Eur 17.99

Starring: Dustin Hoffman, Faye Dunaway, Chief Dan George, Martin Balsam, Richard Mulligan, Jeff Corey, Aimée Eccles, Kelly Jean Peters, Carole Androsky, Ruben Moreno, William Hickey, Jesse Vint, Alan Oppenheimer, Thayer David.

Cinematography: Harry Stradling Jr.

Production Designer: Dean Tavoularis

Art Direction: Angelo P. Graham

Special Makeup: Dick Smith

Special Effects: Logan Frazee

Film Editors: Dede Allen, Richard Marks

Original Music: John Hammond

Written by Calder Willingham from the novel by Thomas Berger

Produced
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ulzana’s Raid

Blu-ray fans are now well aware that many great movies unavailable in the U.S., can be easily found in Europe. One of the best westerns of the ’70s is this jarringly realistic cavalry vs. Apaches drama from Robert Aldrich and Burt Lancaster, which used the ‘R’ rating to show savage details that Hollywood had once avoided. In this case it works — the genuinely scary movie is also a serious meditation on violent America.

Ulzana’s Raid

(Keine Gnade für Ulzana)

All-region Blu-ray + Pal DVD

Explosive Media

1972 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date November 9, 2017 / available through the Amazon Germany website / Eur 17,99

Starring: Burt Lancaster, Richard Jaeckel, Bruce Davison, Jorge Luke, Joaquín Martínez, Lloyd Bochner, Karl Swenson, Douglass Watson, Dran Hamilton, Gladys Holland, Aimee Eccles, Tony Epper, Nick Cravat, Richard Farnsworth, Dean Smith.

Cinematography: Joseph Biroc

Film Editor: Michael Luciano

Original Music: Frank De Vol

Written by Alan Sharp

Produced by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Collector shows that breaking taboos is just getting boring

Movie violence used to have a point, says John Patterson, but this ultra-violent adaptation has more in common with Saw and Hostel than John Fowles

When I first heard about The Collector, the latest obscenely tedious entry in the torture-porn stakes, I wondered if the estate of the late John Fowles – author of the famed middlebrow novel that became the 1965 William Wyler film – might not have a tasty copyright infringement case on its hands.

And then I saw the new movie. "Saw" is the operative word in this context, since its writer-directors, Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan, have umbilical connections with that now long-running franchise showcasing inventive sadism and animal brutality. Frankly, besides the shared title, the new Collector lies a long way from what was in its day a nice, creepy little kidnap-and-imprisonment movie whose main themes were the divisions caused by class and disparity in education.

On the other hand,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hanks and Spielberg pick their battles with The Pacific

After years of ambiguous anti-war movies, HBO's TV epic gives audiences a familiar, clear-cut bad guy

When the first episode of Band Of Brothers, HBO's 10-part saga of a parachute infantry company's progress from D-Day to the German surrender and beyond, was broadcast on American television on 9 September, 2001, the United States had not participated in a full-scale, open-ended shooting war for 25 years, since the withdrawal from Vietnam. Episode two aired five days after the 9/11 attacks, and one suspects many Americans watched its depiction of the D-Day landings with a far greater sense of involvement and gravity than they otherwise might have.

The Pacific, made for HBO by the same team of Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, airs by contrast at a time when America is deeply involved in two distinct and socially divisive wars.

Band Of Brothers had an idealistic, uplifting side along with all the violence and bloodshed. In
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Hanks and Spielberg pick their battles with The Pacific

After years of ambiguous anti-war movies, HBO's TV epic gives audiences a familiar, clear-cut bad guy

When the first episode of Band Of Brothers, HBO's 10-part saga of a parachute infantry company's progress from D-Day to the German surrender and beyond, was broadcast on American television on 9 September, 2001, the United States had not participated in a full-scale, open-ended shooting war for 25 years, since the withdrawal from Vietnam. Episode two aired five days after the 9/11 attacks, and one suspects many Americans watched its depiction of the D-Day landings with a far greater sense of involvement and gravity than they otherwise might have.

The Pacific, made for HBO by the same team of Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, airs by contrast at a time when America is deeply involved in two distinct and socially divisive wars.

Band Of Brothers had an idealistic, uplifting side along with all the violence and bloodshed. In
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Most Savage Film In History!

I recently posted an item on S & A about the controversial film Serbian Film which was screened recently at the SXSW in Austin to stunned reactions from the sickening violence and depravity in the film. The fact that films have been always controversial over violent content is definitely not a new thing and I was reminded by that when I recently came across an article about the now forgotten 1970 western Soldier Blue. A massive hit in the U.K. and overseas but far less so in the U.S. (for reasons that will be obvious in a moment) the film was produced by Avco Embassy, a major film production company back then, and directed by Ralph Nelson.

Nelson, who died in 1987, made several films with Sidney Poitier (Lilies of the Field, Duel at Diablo, The Wilby Conspiracy) and many other films that dealt, as well, with social issues such as 1969’s …tick.
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

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