8.1/10
21,901
157 user 141 critic

The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara (2003)

Trailer
2:07 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 on Prime Video

ON DISC
The story of America as seen through the eyes of the former Secretary of Defense under President John F. Kennedy and President Lyndon Baines Johnson, Robert McNamara.

Director:

Errol Morris
Won 1 Oscar. Another 11 wins & 16 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Documentary | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Troublemaking duo Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno, posing as their industrious alter-egos, expose the people profiting from Hurricane Katrina, the faces behind the environmental disaster in Bhopal, and other shocking events.

Directors: Andy Bichlbaum, Mike Bonanno, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Reggie Watts, Mike Bonanno, Andy Bichlbaum
Collapse II (2009)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A documentary on Michael Ruppert, a police officer turned independent reporter who predicted the current financial crisis in his self-published newsletter, From the Wilderness.

Director: Chris Smith
Stars: Michael Ruppert
Traceroute (2016)
Documentary | Biography | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A Personal Journey Into The Uncharted Depths Of Nerd Culture, A Realm Full Of Dangers, Creatures And More Or Less Precarious Working Conditions...

Director: Johannes Grenzfurthner
Stars: Johannes Grenzfurthner, Eddie Codel, Jenny Marx
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

A lawyer takes on a case of a prison guard in South Africa who is traumatized by the executions he's witnessed.

Director: Oliver Schmitz
Stars: Andrea Riseborough, Steve Coogan, Inge Beckmann
Adventure | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Landing in the paradise, cross-cutting back to the main characters past life in New York, Erik (Matton) a young writer dependent on the love of his life Joanna (Larsdotter), argue and split up in the unfamiliar country of Thailand.

Director: Bank Tangjaitrong
Stars: Johan Matton, Linnea Larsdotter, Emrhys Cooper
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9/10 X  

LET ME GET MY COAT! [Waar is mijn jas?] Netherlands, 2004 In 1980, Wim Verstappen and Paul Verhoeven, Holland's best-known film makers, were interviewed by film writer Ruud den Drijver. The... See full summary »

Director: Dirk Rijneke
Stars: Wim Verstappen, Paul Verhoeven, Ruud Den Dryver
Time Jumpers (2018)
Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

When a young man finds a time machine device, his life spins out of control.

Director: Svend Ploug Johansen
Stars: Taylor Gerard Hart, Mathilde Norholt, Petra Staduan
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.5/10 X  

Two paranormal investigators are unexpectedly thrown together in the hope of solving a 100 year mystery. Locked for three nights in a house with a dark and unsettling past, the two ... See full summary »

Director: David Ryan Keith
Stars: Michael Koltes, Paul Flannery, Steve Weston
Derelict (2017)
Drama | Horror | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

Three friends find themselves fighting for their lives when their urban exploration goes horribly wrong.

Directors: Cristian Broadhurst, Cristian Broadhurst, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Tristan Balz, James Broadhurst, Justin Burford
Violentia I (2018)
Drama | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

After a random school shootout leaves a scientist's daughter and the shooter dead, he uses nano-robots to look into a psychopath's memories to find reasons for violence and a way to treat it.

Director: Ray Raghavan
Stars: David Lewis, Emily Holmes, Mackenzie Gray
Clawed (2017)
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A geology field trip into the remote Bear Claw wilderness area turns into a nightmare for a group of college students as they find themselves prey to a viscous man-beast the locals call The Shadow of Death.

Director: Steve Taylor
Stars: Wade Sullivan, Cynthia Calvert, Felissa Rose
Zayana (2019)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

The film deals with certain major women issues within Oman and Asia with a focus on Oman and India, and how an Omani conservative society treats it. It is a self-discovery journey and a mixture between drama and road-movie.

Director: Khalid Abdulrahim Al-Zadjali
Stars: Noura Al-Farsi, Ali Al-Amri, M.R. Gopakumar
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Robert McNamara ... Himself
Edit

Storyline

Former corporate whiz kid Robert McNamara was the controversial Secretary of Defense in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, during the height of the Vietnam War. This Academy Award-winning documentary, augmented by archival footage, gives the conflicted McNamara a platform on which he attempts to confront his and the U.S. government's actions in Southeast Asia in light of the horrors of modern warfare, the end of ideology and the punitive judgment of history. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for images and thematic issues of war and destruction | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 March 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Fog of War See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$41,449, 21 December 2003

Gross USA:

$4,198,566

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$5,038,841
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Errol Morris's wife jokingly nicknamed his interviewing device the Interrotron, which is what it later became known as. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[Per contact at the Errol Morris Foundation, the date is 8/5/1964, and the clip is from Press Conference on The Gulf of Tonkin Incident, National Archives #111-LC-48220]
Robert McNamara: [archival footage from the press conference on the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, 5 August 1964] Is this chart at a reasonable height for you? Or do you want it lowered? All right. Earlier tonight - first let me ask the TV, are you ready? All set?
See more »

Crazy Credits

Director of Officeland Security: Jackpot Junior See more »

Connections

Referenced in At the Movies: Venice Film Festival 2013 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

100,000 People
(uncredited)
by Philip Glass
Ocean Mountain Music
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Fascinating and Compelling
9 February 2004 | by howard.schumannSee all my reviews

Educated in the best Ivy League schools, successful leaders in the business world, they were the best and the brightest, the core of John F. Kennedy's administration. They came to office in 1961 with high hopes that the world would become a better place. When they left, these expectations lay shattered amidst the rice paddies and jungles of Vietnam. Considered the architect of what came to be known as "McNamara's War", Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of Defense under both Kennedy and Johnson, was one of the brightest but had the reputation of being aloof and arrogant. This public image, however, may not have been the whole story. In the fascinating Oscar-nominated documentary, The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara, Errol Morris (The Thin Blue Line, Dr. Death) interviews the now 86-year old Defense Secretary in an effort to come to terms with what led to the quagmire of Vietnam and reveals a more complex, even strangely sympathetic man.

Interspersed with archival footage, actual news broadcasts, and tape-recorded conversations from the period, the interview documents McNamara's personal account of his involvement with American policy from WW II to the 1960s. Culled from 20 hours of tape, the interview is separated into eleven segments corresponding to lessons learned during his life such as "Empathize with your enemy", and "Rationality will not save us". The Secretary does not apologize for the war, saying he was only trying to serve an elected President but is willing to admit his mistakes. He says that he now realizes the Vietnam conflict was considered by the North Vietnamese to be a civil war and that they were fighting for the independence of their country from colonialism, (something opponents of the war had been trying to tell him for over five years). Morris never undercuts McNamara's dignity or pushes him into a corner yet also does not slide troubling questions under the rug and there are some questions McNamara does not want to discuss.

Though his reputation is that of a hawk, previously unheard tape-recorded conversations between McNamara and both Presidents reveal that he urged caution and opposed the continued escalation of the Vietnam War. In 1964, we hear Johnson say. "I always thought it was foolish for you to make any statements about withdrawing, but you and the President thought otherwise, and I just sat silent." McNamara also discusses his role in World War II, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and his accomplishments as President of the Ford Motor Company. In talking about Cuba, he reveals how close the world came to nuclear annihilation, saved only by the offhand suggestion by an underling. McNamara repeats over and over again, demonstrating with his fingers, how close we all came to nuclear war. He talks openly about his involvement in World War II under General Curtis Le and how he helped plan the firebombing of 67 Japanese cities including Tokyo in which 100,000 Japanese civilians were killed. In a startling admission, he says that if the allies had not won the war, both he and Le May could have been tried as war criminals.

Mr. McNamara has spoken out a bit late to save the lives of 50,000 Americans and several million Vietnamese but at least he has spoken and we can learn from his reflections. Though the Secretary does not apologize for the war, saying he was only trying to serve an elected President, to his credit he has looked at the corrosiveness of war and what it does to the human soul and we are left with the sense of a man who has come a long way. While his lesson that "In order to do good, one may have to do evil" sounds suspiciously like "the end justifies the means", his sentiments are clear that the U.S. should never invade another country without the support of its friends and allies. He says, "We are the strongest nation in the world today", he says, "and I do not believe we should ever apply that economic, political or military power unilaterally. If we'd followed that rule in Vietnam, we wouldn't have been there. None of our allies supported us. If we can't persuade nations with comparable values of the merit of our cause, we'd better re-examine our reasoning." A valuable lesson indeed.


78 of 85 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 157 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Free Movies and TV Shows You Can Watch Now

On IMDb TV, you can catch Hollywood hits and popular TV series at no cost. Select any poster below to play the movie, totally free!

Browse free movies and TV series

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed