Unto the Third and Fourth Generation (1914)

John Smythe returns from war as a youth who has been seasoned by experience, vested with ambition and armed with a sword which has won him honors. His father is one of those merry old ... See full summary »

Director:

Edward LeSaint (as Edward J. LeSaint)

Writer:

William E. Wing (story)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Guy Oliver ... John Smythe aka William Smith
Stella Razeto ... Mary Wayne
Al W. Filson Al W. Filson ... Squire Smythe
Joe King ... William Wayne
Lea Errol Lea Errol ... Mrs. Smythe
George Hernandez George Hernandez ... Mr. Smith
Anna Dodge Anna Dodge ... Mrs. Smith
Lillian Clark Lillian Clark ... Nell (as Lilly Clark)
Philo McCullough ... Ned
William Hutchison ... (as William P. Hutchinson)

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Storyline

John Smythe returns from war as a youth who has been seasoned by experience, vested with ambition and armed with a sword which has won him honors. His father is one of those merry old English squires, of the hard riding, hard drinking type, who lives in the open in the saddle, and when at home takes much to the flagon. His mother is a gentle woman, and abhors the night revels in the hall of their manor, but she has been overruled so long, that she has submitted to the disagreeable function that has become a bad habit. When the stalwart son returns, the jolly squire marks his approval of his triumphs with much wine. The poor mother interferes, but the squire declares that it will "put red blood in him like that of his ancestors." John soon meets up with blushing, budding Mary Wayne, their engagement is announced. A friendly rivalry springs up between John and his cousin, William Wayne. The latter strangely proves his superiority in archery and horse racing, but the former, as a soldier... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

User Reviews

It jumps over a hundred years without warning
31 March 2018 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

A two-part offering that is more of a preachment than a drama. It is not skillfully pictured and is weak in its transitions. It jumps over a hundred years without warning or explanation; none was needed by the story, it is true, but the jump is a jolt none the less. We leave in one scene the coast of Ireland and come up against the scoreboard of a college football game. Another scene early in the picture shows an aristocratic squire's family going in to dinner and on the table are four wine glasses. Three of them are soiled with the dregs of wine and one is half full. We don't believe the squire came in early and drank what had been poured out. One heroine, a fiancée of the squire's son, points at dinner to the roast as soon as it is brought in as asking for some tit-bit to be saved for her. and this is also very unlikely among well-bred people. These would hurt any story, but this one is not strong at best. W.E. Wing is the author and Edward Le Saint the producer. There is no brilliant playing in it. - The Moving Picture World, January 17, 1914


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 January 1914 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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