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George Clooney Wraps Production on Netflix Movie Now Titled ‘The Midnight Sky’

  • Indiewire
George Clooney Wraps Production on Netflix Movie Now Titled ‘The Midnight Sky’
George Clooney has wrapped filming on a Netflix adaptation of the novel “Good Morning, Midnight” for Netflix, as confirmed by the streamer in a recent tweet. The movie is now titled “The Midnight Sky.” Because, no, it’s not that “Good Morning, Midnight,” a novel penned by Jean Rhys in the 1930s about an alcoholic forced by her enabling bestie to spend her dying days drying out in a Paris hostel. This is a science-fiction story, lifted from Lily Brooks-Dalton’s 2017 novel centered on Augustine (George Clooney), a lonely scientist in the Arctic, as he races to stop Sully (Felicity Jones) and her fellow astronauts from returning home to a mysterious global catastrophe.

David Oyelowo, Kyle Chandler, Demián Bichir, and Tiffany Boone co-star. Per Netflix, the film is set to be released later in 2020. The screenplay comes from “The Revenant” co-writer Mark L. Smith.

This is Clooney’s first return
See full article at Indiewire »

DC Films Head Allegedly Forced Ben Affleck Out Of The Batman Role

DC Films Head Allegedly Forced Ben Affleck Out Of The Batman Role
Ben Affleck had a rough 2010s. Sure, he got some of that Oscar goodness in 2012 with Argo, but other than that, he came on as the most divisive Dark Knight ever, directed a major flop of a passion project, got divorced from Jennifer Garner, and fell deep back into alcoholism. Things seemed to be on an upswing for the troubled mutlti-hyphenate though when it was announced he was taking over The Batman from Zack Snyder and crew…until he unceremoniously left the project. While he’s since opened up about the turmoil surrounding the pic, some new rumors have surfaced now surrounding the film’s troubled development.

Geoff Johns, the man who took over executive production duties on DC Films after the under-performances, both commercially and critically, of Snyder’s ilk, reportedly clashed with Ben Affleck over the film’s tone. Since audiences weren’t keen on the grimdark nature of the previous DC movies,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Trailer and Exclusive Images from New Supernatural Thriller I Am Fear, Coming to Theaters on February 20th and VOD on March 3rd

  • DailyDead
Trailer and Exclusive Images from New Supernatural Thriller I Am Fear, Coming to Theaters on February 20th and VOD on March 3rd
A journalist faces almost certain death after she's abducted by terrorists in Los Angeles, but ravenous wildfires and an unsettling supernatural presence bring new levels of terror to her perilous predicament in Kevin Shulman's I Am Fear. Featuring a cast that includes Kristina Klebe, Bill Moseley, and William Forsythe, I Am Fear is coming to select theaters this week from Shout! Factory, and we've been provided with the trailer and exclusive images from the film to share with Daily Dead readers!

Below, you can watch the trailer and view a gallery of images from I Am Fear below, and keep an eye out for the film in select theaters beginning Wednesday, February 20th, including the Laemmle Santa Monica and the Logan Theatre in Chicago (followed by a Q&a with Jeremy Rosen and William Forsythe). Following its theatrical release, I Am Fear will be released on VOD beginning March 3rd.
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Balloon’ Film Review: Daring Real-Life Escape Saga Becomes Paint-by-Numbers Thriller

  • The Wrap
‘Balloon’ Film Review: Daring Real-Life Escape Saga Becomes Paint-by-Numbers Thriller
Movies about 20th-century Germany tend to focus on, well, you know. 30 years after East and West reunified, however, “Balloon” serves as a reminder of what the country went through once World War II gave way to the Cold War — and why it still matters.

Unfortunately, Michael Bully Herbig’s film — telling a story previously dramatized in the 1980s Disney movie “Night Crossing” — plays out with such unconvincing drama that you might be left wondering whether its based-on-a-true-story subject matter would have been better served by a documentary.

It begins on Youth Dedication Day, when eighth-graders in the East are loosed upon the world after pledging their allegiance to socialism, and quickly reveals the title’s significance as a handful of floating blue balloons alert a family of would-be defectors that the time has come. Herbig treats it as a given that anyone living in the Soviet-controlled East would risk their lives to escape,
See full article at The Wrap »

Ben Affleck on The Batman: A Friend Said ‘You’ll Drink Yourself to Death’

David Crow Feb 18, 2020

Ben Affleck opens up about serious drinking problems in the last decade, including a warning that led to him leaving The Batman behind.

Once upon a time, and not that long ago, Ben Affleck was Batman. In fact, more than just being the latest actor in a long line to play the role, he was going to write and direct The Batman, a solo Dark Knight spinoff movie tied into the DC Extended Universe. That obviously did not happen, and indeed the years during which he was attached to the project were among some of the grimmest of his personal live.

He is coming public about that and much more in an intimately revealing profile in The New York Times. Speaking candidly with the paper of record’s Brooks Barnes, Affleck opened up about his struggles with alcoholism and pain, which coincided with his highest-profile projects in
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ben Affleck Says He Left Batman Role Over Concerns Of Relapse

Ben Affleck Says He Left Batman Role Over Concerns Of Relapse
Even though Matt Reeves’ The Batman has only been shooting for a matter of weeks, in an alternate universe we would have already seen Ben Affleck’s version of the movie by now. Although his appearances as the Dark Knight came in critical disappointments Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice, Justice League and a Suicide Squad cameo, the general consensus is that the 47 year-old had the potential to be one of the all-time great big screen Caped Crusaders, but was let down by the quality of the projects he starred in.

When The Batman was originally announced back in 2014, fans were excited by the prospect of Affleck pulling double duty as both leading man and director, having reinvented himself as a critically-acclaimed filmmaker over the previous few years thanks to films like Gone Baby Gone, The Town and the Best Picture-winning Argo. Unfortunately, the project was hit by a series of delays,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Best Oscar Winners Of The Decade

The Best Oscar Winners Of The Decade
With not just the 92nd Academy Awards in the rearview mirror, but a whole decade’s worth of cinema, I wanted to do something fun today. As we move on to a whole new year/decade, why not rank the decade’s Oscar winners? We’ll be starting back up soon with the series looking at the best winners all time in each category, so consider this a bit of a preview! Look at today’s post as a sort of snapshot of what the Academy’s decade was like, as we move forward to a whole new one… First up, the various below the line categories: Best Animated Feature 1. Toy Story 3 2. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse 3. Inside Out 4. Coco 5. Frozen 6. Toy Story 4 7. Zootopia 8. Big Hero 6 9. Rango 10. Brave Best Production Design 1. Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood 2. Mad Max: Fury Road 3. Black Panther 4. La La Land 5. The Grand Budapest Hotel
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

‘Parasite,’ the Aftermath: Already, It’s Receiving a Huge Oscar Bump

  • Indiewire
‘Parasite,’ the Aftermath: Already, It’s Receiving a Huge Oscar Bump
How’s this for an Oscar bounce? “Parasite” (Neon), per IndieWire sources, grossed $500,000 Monday. It placed as the #4 film overall, with the highest per-screen average of any non-platform release. That’s up from #11 for the weekend, where it grossed $1,560,000. That puts it at $36 million and counting.

It did $159,000 last Monday, so on the same number of screens the gross tripled. Its Sunday gross was $433,000, with an average Monday normally seeing a 70% or greater drop. Instead, it improved. The number appears to be a bigger figure than any day after Best Picture win since “The King’s Speech” in 2011.

And that comes at the same time both Amazon and iTunes list “Parasite” as the #1 movie rental on their home viewing sites. Though not unusual for a next-day response, a subtitled film leading these charts is nearly unprecedented.

That compares to its rival “1917,” which grossed over $800,000 Monday after $9.2 million over the weekend.
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscar Viewership Hits All-Time Low With 23.6 Million

  • Deadline
Oscar Viewership Hits All-Time Low With 23.6 Million
It was a historic 92nd Academy Awards with a first Best Picture recipient not in the English language in Parasite adding an element of surprise to a largely predictable winners list. There was something historic in the ratings for the 2020 Oscars too — an historic low.

Last year, the Academy Awards bet on no traditional host, kicked off the night with an energetic performance by Queen and Adam Lambert, employed “not hosts” with Saturday Night Live pedigree to do an opening monologue, kept the show’s length under 3.5 hours and created a musical moment with Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s performance of “Shallow.”

The result was the first ratings increase in five years, so the Oscars tried to replicate the formula Sunday: no traditional host, high-octane opening number by Janelle Monae. monologue by SNL alums Steve Martin and Chris Rock, and a surprise music
See full article at Deadline »

How did Bong Joon Ho pull off that huge Best Director Oscar upset? Here are 5 explanations

How did Bong Joon Ho pull off that huge Best Director Oscar upset? Here are 5 explanations
The biggest shocker at Sunday’s Oscars came in a category where few thought there would be one: Best Director. Sam Mendes appeared to have that on lock after claiming the corresponding prizes at the Golden Globes, Directors Guild of America Awards and the BAFTAs for “1917.” “Parasite” winning Best Picture over “1917” had better odds in our predictions than Bong Joon Ho did of beating Mendes. So how did Bong pull it off?

1. The passion is real and spectacular

Last week, I argued that “Parasite” would win Best Picture because it was the “Fleabag” of the Oscars, aka there was and is tremendous passion for it. In hindsight, I should’ve taken the analogy further because Bong is the Phoebe Waller-Bridge and Mendes is the Julia Louis-Dreyfus here. Just like with “Parasite” and Best Picture, “Fleabag” had better odds of winning the Best Comedy Series Emmy than Pwb did
See full article at Gold Derby »

Glory to the holy WiFi! 7 ways ‘Parasite’ made history with its Oscar wins

Glory to the holy WiFi! 7 ways ‘Parasite’ made history with its Oscar wins
Parasite” became the first foreign language film to win Best Picture at the Oscars to go with three other victories for Best Director, Best Original Screenplay and Best International Feature Film. but that’s not the only history it made on Sunday. Here are all the barriers the South Korean hit has broken.

1. First foreign language film to win Best Picture

Roma” came close, but “Parasite” crossed the line. “Parasite” was only the 12th film not in the English language to be nominated for Best Picture and the first from South Korea. Bong Joon Ho and Kwak Sin Ae are the first Asian producers to win Best Picture.

2. First South Korean film to win Best International Feature Film

Hard to believe, but no South Korean film had ever been nominated for Best International Feature Film, fka Best Foreign Language Film, until “Parasite.” And now the country is 1/1 in a category that historically favors European films.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Parasite’ Win Rescues a Predictable Oscar Show With a Shot of Exuberance

  • The Wrap
‘Parasite’ Win Rescues a Predictable Oscar Show With a Shot of Exuberance
Parasite” made history at Sunday’s Academy Awards on a number of different levels. It was the first Korean feature to ever win an Oscar, the first Palme d’Or winner to also win Best Picture since “Marty” did it 64 years ago — and, biggest of all, the first film not in English to win the top award in the 92-year history of the Oscars.

The twisted black comedy about class differences, from a director known for horror movies and never before taken seriously by the Academy, beat Sam Mendes’ “1917,” which had won the Producers Guild and Directors Guild awards, usually sure-fire Oscar indicators. It also beat two epics from two massively influential American directors of different generations, Martin Scorsese’s elegiac “The Irishman” and Quentin Tarantino’s consummate “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” as well as the unexpected crowd-pleasers “Jojo Rabbit” and “Joker.”

None of this came as a real surprise,
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscars live blog 2020: ‘Parasite’ is the night’s big winner with 4 including Best Picture in historic victory!

  • Gold Derby
Oscars live blog 2020: ‘Parasite’ is the night’s big winner with 4 including Best Picture in historic victory!
Who were the big winners at the 92nd Annual Academy Awards, who lost, who upset and who made history? Go here for the complete list of winners in all 24 categories as they’re announced, but scroll down here for our minute-by-minute analysis as winners are announced throughout the night.

SEE2020 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 92nd Academy Awards

“Joker” led the Oscar nominations with 11, followed by “The Irishman,” “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and “1917” with 10 apiece. And there was a lot of history at stake for those films. “Joker” had the potential to become the first superhero (or in this case supervillain) comic book movie to win Best Picture. Netflix‘s “The Irishman” would’ve been the first streaming movie to win. “Hollywood” had the potential to bring filmmaker Quentin Tarantino his first Best Picture and Best Director victories despite two past wins for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Obamas’ Production Company Wins First Oscar With ‘American Factory’

  • Variety
Netflix’s “American Factory,” produced by Michelle and Barack Obama, took home the award for best documentary at the 92nd Oscars. It’s the first Academy Award for the Obamas’ production company, Higher Ground.

The former president and first lady weren’t able to attend Sunday’s ceremony in Hollywood. The award was accepted by the film’s co-directors Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert.

Accepting the award, Reichert said, “Working people have it harder and harder these days — and we believe that things will get better when workers of the world unite.”

Michelle Obama sent her congratulations, tweeting “The best stories are rarely tidy or perfect. But that’s where the truth so often lies.”

Congrats to Julia, Steven, and the whole crew on winning Best Documentary for #AmericanFactory, Higher Ground's first release! So glad to see their heart and honesty recognized—because the best stories are rarely tidy or perfect.
See full article at Variety »

Brad Pitt is now the 3rd person to win Oscars for acting and Best Picture

Brad Pitt is now the 3rd person to win Oscars for acting and Best Picture
Brad Pitt won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar Sunday night — his first for acting — but any awards buff knows it’s not his first career Oscar. He previously won Best Picture as producer on “12 Years Slave” (2013) and is now one of three people to have won Oscars for acting and producing — and all for different films.

Michael Douglas was the first, prevailing for Best Picture with “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) first and then 12 years later for Best Actor for “Wall Street” (1987). Pitt’s “Ocean’s” pal George Clooney snagged Best Supporting Actor for “Syriana” (2005) and then added a Best Picture statuette seven years later with “Argo” (2012). So Pitt’s six-year gap means he’s accomplished this in the shortest time span.

Laurence Olivier won Best Actor for “Hamlet” (1948) and produced the Best Picture champ as well, but at the time, the Best Picture Oscar went to the studio,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Cynthia Erivo’s Potential EGOT and 28 Other Oscar Records and Milestones to Watch for This Sunday

  • The Wrap
Cynthia Erivo’s Potential EGOT and 28 Other Oscar Records and Milestones to Watch for This Sunday
Regardless of what happens on Sunday night at the Dolby Theatre, it’s likely that we’ll see a few landmark wins and some new Oscar records. Here are some of the notable ones that could happen:

• If 16 of the 62 nominated women win, this year’s Oscars will break the record set last year for the most female winners ever.

• If “Parasite” wins in any of the six categories in which it is nominated, it’ll be the first Korean film ever to win in that category.

• If “Parasite” wins Best Picture, it’ll be the first non-English film to win that award.

•It will also be the first Palme d’Or winner from the Cannes Film Festival to take Best Picture since 1955’s “Marty,” the only previous film to score those two awards.

• If Bong Joon Ho wins Best Director for “Parasite,” he’ll be the second director of a non-English film to win — and also the second in a row, after Alfonso Cuaron for “Roma” last year.
See full article at The Wrap »

Oscars 2020: We Predict the Winners in All 24 Categories (Photos)

  • The Wrap
Oscars 2020: We Predict the Winners in All 24 Categories (Photos)
Up to a certain point, this year’s Oscars seem to be one of the most predictable in recent memory. The four acting races seem to have been decided long ago, and many of the other categories have strong frontrunners as well – if Roger Deakins doesn’t win Best Cinematography and “Parasite” isn’t named Best International Feature Film, 3,000 people in the Dolby Theatre will go into shock en masse.

But how much do we really know? Best Picture has a clear frontrunner but also the tantalizing possibility of an upset that wouldn’t surprise too many people. And a number of other categories – including animated feature, documentary feature and short and film editing – could go in a few different directions.

With voting closed, the obvious favorites are “1917” and “Parasite,” both of which should go home from the ceremony with some shiny new statuettes. But the year that was
See full article at The Wrap »

2020 Oscar Predictions: Best Adapted Screenplay (Updated: February 9)

2020 Oscar Predictions: Best Adapted Screenplay (Updated: February 9)
At the 2019 Academy Awards, “BlacKkKlansman” director Spike Lee shared in the win for Best Adapted Screenplay for bringing Ron Stallworth‘s memoir of the same name to the screen. This award, which dates back to the first Oscars in 1928, has gone to only a dozen adaptations of such books. Five more of those non-fiction books adaptations were also winners in this decade: “The Social Network” (2011), “Argo” (2012), “12 Years a Slave” (2013) and “The Imitation Game” (2014) and “The Big Short” (2015). (Scroll down for the most up-to-date 2020 Oscars predictions for Best Adapted Screenplay and be sure to check out our predictions for Best Original Screenplay.)

Over the 91-year history of this award, novels have been the primary source material. Works of fiction have been the basis of 47 of the winners of this race over the years. The most recent of these was in 2018 when James Ivory won for his adaptation of André Aciman
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ranking the Best Picture Winners of the 2010s

This weekend will see the 92nd Academy Awards take place, celebrating the best films of the year that was 2019. To mark the build-up to the occasion, we take a look at the past winners of the 2010s, with a personal ranking of the winners of the Best Picture races of their respective years!

Green Book, the winner of Best Picture in 2019

9. Green Book (2018 – The 91st Academy Awards)

Likely to be at the bottom of most 2010’s best picture rankings, Green Book confounded some when it went through and cleared up at a lot of ceremonies during last year’s award season. Now that the dust has settled, there’s no denying that this is very much a racial reconciliation fantasy that sugar coats its subject a bit too much, but it is not without its charms, particularly thanks to the performances at its centre from Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Will the BAFTAs’ love of car racing movies in editing lead us off track again for the Oscars?

Will the BAFTAs’ love of car racing movies in editing lead us off track again for the Oscars?
The BAFTAs’ Best Film Editing award has clued us in on some close Oscar races before, like with “Whiplash” (2014) and “Hacksaw Ridge” (2016), both of which went on to win the editing Oscar. They’ve mismatched four times in the 2010s, most recently last year when BAFTA went for “Vice” and Oscar crowned “Bohemian Rhapsody” and that meet-cute of a thousand cuts. The other three times? They all involved car racing movies, just like this year.

Like everyone in Europe, BAFTA adores car films (there’s a reason “Ford v Ferrari” is known as “Le Mans ’66” across the pond) and their exciting, fast, well-edited racing scenes. BAFTA gave its editing prize to “Senna” (2011) and “Rush” (2013), two films that combined for a total of zero Oscar nominations. The academy anointed “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” (2011) and “Gravity” (2013) instead. “Baby Driver” (2017) zoomed past the competition to claim BAFTA and was nominated for the editing Oscar,
See full article at Gold Derby »
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