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American Cinema of the 70s 

The Story of Film examines American cinema in the period of 1967-1979 also known as New American Cinema. Films of this time generally fell into three types: satirical films that mocked ... See full summary »

Director:

Mark Cousins

Writer:

Mark Cousins
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
Mark Cousins ... Self - Presenter
Buck Henry ... Self
Charles Burnett ... Self - Interviewee
Robert Towne ... Self - Interviewee
Francis Ford Coppola ... Self (archive footage)
Michael Powell ... Self (archive footage)
Martin Scorsese ... Self (archive footage)
Thelma Schoonmaker ... Self (archive footage)
Paul Schrader ... Self - Interviewee
Peter Bogdanovich ... Himeself (archive footage)
Haskell Wexler ... Self - Interviewee
Roman Polanski ... Self (archive footage)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Juan Diego Botto ... Narrator (voice)

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Storyline

The Story of Film examines American cinema in the period of 1967-1979 also known as New American Cinema. Films of this time generally fell into three types: satirical films that mocked society and the times, dissident films that challenged the conventional style of cinema, and assimilationist films that rework old studio genres with new techniques. Satirical films include the work of Frank Tashlin, Buck Henry, Mike Nichols, Robert Altman, and Milos Forman. Dissident films include the work of Dennis Hopper, Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Paul Schrader, Charles Burnett, and Woody Allen. Assimilationist films include the work of Peter Bogdanovich, Sam Peckinpah, and Terrence Malick. It also looks at the assimilationist classics Cabaret (1972), The Godfather (1972), and Chinatown (1974). Written by Shatterdaymorn

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Did You Know?

Quotes

Mark Cousins - Presenter: [about inverted motifs] The great French playwright, Feydeau, said that in order to be funny you need to think sad first.
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Connections

Features Catch-22 (1970) See more »

User Reviews

 
A Rather Limited Look at American Cinema
22 April 2015 | by HitchcocSee all my reviews

A look at what was going on in American cinema during the sixties and seventies. The directors zoomed in on include Mich Nichols (for "Catch 22" of all choices and "The Graduate" which is much superior). Robert Altman, mainly for MASH. Milos Forman for "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" among others. Dennis Hopper, who I'm not sure belongs in this episode although there are good things about him. We get the heavyweights, Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola. There is Paul Schrader and Woody Allen and Peter Bogdonavich. For violence and cinematography of a whole different variety, we have Sam Peckinpaugh. Roman Polansky really comes into his own at this time (particularly the masterwork, "Chinatown." But there are so many that are left. Somehow Truffaut's "Jules and Jim" make it into this offering.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 October 2011 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Hopscotch Films See more »
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Technical Specs

Color:

Color
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